Thanks, Dr. Fauci!

Perhaps the most famous NIH staffer right now is Anthony Fauci, MD, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), and one of the leading voices throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Prepared by more than 50 years of government service and research on infectious diseases, Dr. Fauci is a public servant who brings reason, expertise, and a keen sense of how to mobilize the public health sector to act against this unprecedented threat to public health.

Like many others around the country and the world, my family and I think of Dr. Fauci as “our doctor.” He speaks to us, giving a personal response to ensure the public’s health. He understands the challenges of having family at a distance during times when travel and family gatherings are discouraged to reduce the spread of infection. He shares the joys of those reunions—full of hugs from family and friends—so long missed. It’s amazing to me that Dr. Fauci has been able to convey such warmth and concern to the world and be the deliverer of trusted knowledge in such a personal manner. More than once, conversation at a family dinner or on a family phone call has included the question, “But what does Dr. Fauci think about . . .?” followed by heartfelt wishes of gratitude from my mother and siblings!

I am privileged to be part of the NIH leadership team who meets weekly to advance the mission of the world’s largest research enterprise. While we address wide ranging issues from advancing biomedical science to NIH infrastructure and operations, discussions about NIH’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic still dominate. Like others, I find Tony a wise and experienced colleague, thoughtful in his contributions, and quick to bring a sometimes much-needed touch of humor into complicated conversations. I marvel at his stamina and the breadth of issues that engage his mind.

Tony Fauci has built a superb team of scientists, clinicians, and administrators within NIAID. The dedication and intellectual generosity evident in his contributions to our efforts are evident across NIAID – clearly an inspirational leader motivates and inspires!

So please join me in expressing gratitude to my colleague, Tony Fauci – a national treasure!

Going Back to School Safely

Guest post by Diana W. Bianchi, MD, Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the National Institutes of Health

Originally released on the Director’s Corner blog.

As schools across the United States begin to resume full-time, in-person education, I am hopeful that this academic year may be a more typical one. The in-person school environment and the wide range of services offered there are critical for the development and well-being of our nation’s young people. Without in-person schooling, many children miss out on school-based meals, speech or occupational therapy, and after-school programs. Loss of such services disproportionately affects minorities, socially and economically disadvantaged children, children with disabilities, and those with medical complexities.

Generating robust scientific data to inform policies to return children to the classroom safely and equitably during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is of paramount importance not only for children, but also to allow their parents to return to work. We now have safe and effective vaccines available for adults and children ages 12 years and older, as well as established public health measures to prevent transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Yet the emergence of the more transmissible delta SARS-CoV-2 variant and the rising COVID-19 cases across the country remind us that we must remain vigilant and adaptable to changing circumstances.

NICHD manages the Safe Return to School Diagnostic Testing Initiative, launched earlier this year as part of the NIH Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics-Underserved Populations (RADx-UP) program. This initiative addresses the needs of children with unequal access to COVID-19 testing and who face barriers to attending school remotely, including those who do not have adequate equipment, internet access, or adult supervision at home.

The RADx-UP Return to School projects combine frequent COVID-19 testing with proven safety measures to reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2. They also are exploring the influence of vaccination for eligible staff and students, addressing vaccine hesitancy, and seeking information on circulating SARS-CoV-2 variants and breakthrough infections. Funding for the first set of projects was announced in April, and additional projects were funded in July. Currently, 16 projects are ongoing at schools across the country, including public, charter, tribal, early education, and special education schools. Participating schools serve racially and ethnically diverse populations, including African Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Latinos/Latinas, Asian Americans, and Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Critically, several projects include children with medical complexities and/or intellectual and developmental disabilities who may not be able to use COVID-19 mitigation measures such as wearing masks or social distancing.

On August 9, NIH hosted a virtual workshop that brought together RADx-UP Return to School investigators and other researchers conducting school-based research on COVID-19 diagnostic testing to present data acquired to date, learn from each other, and support the safe return of children to in-person school.

Among other topics, workshop participants discussed the critical importance of engaging local communities in this research. Communities need access to the most up-to-date scientific evidence to weigh the benefits and challenges of implementing different COVID-19 mitigation strategies. Scientists need community input to understand the attitudes, knowledge, and barriers that may influence individual choices to enroll in COVID-19 testing programs and return to in-person learning. By working together, we can ensure a safe return to school for all.

Imagination – The Cornerstone of Innovation

Part 1 of a series discussing the importance of imagination.

Everyone is talking about the “new normal” now — the post-pandemic space after we return to the physical location of work, school or play— and asking, what will life be like? There are many calls for innovative thinking. One of the best things about a library is that it provides a foundation for innovation, but building the pathway between great science, good ideas, and innovative products and services takes imagination. NLM is a springboard for innovation in health care, from describing previously not-well-understood biological processes to creating new drugs and therapeutics. Even taking the leap from this springboard requires imagination!

Imagination is a process of the mind somewhere between cognition, recall, and play, that allows a person to create novel ideas, sensations, and visualizations. Somewhere between play and wool-gathering, imagination is the capacity of an individual to conjure up ideas that can be pleasing or frightening, phantasmagoric or peaceful. Sometimes the experience of imagination is a self-contained pleasure; other times it becomes a catalyst for new ways of living or new products and services that can help the public in different ways.

Imagination is the starting point for innovation. It stimulates innovation through the experience of a mental what-if, unconstrained by the realities of physics or finance. Imagination is a talent that can be learned and refined over time, benefiting from the reinforcement of envisioning that which might be, and using that vision as a test case for that which can be. Everyone can exercise imagination, and through this practice, make the world around them a better place!

Nurses are pretty good at applying imagination to complex patient care situations. Take, for example, Marie Van Brittan Brown an African American nurse living in the Jamaica neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. In the early 1960s, she and her husband Albert, an electronics technician, imagined a way to help people feel and be safe in their homes.

Figure 1: Diagram of the original 1966 patent request filed by Marie Van Brittan Brown and Albert L. Brown courtesy of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Being and feeling safe at home is particularly important for homebound individuals. Many homebound individuals live alone and are isolated. They may lack the physical ability or strength to investigate a strange sound outside or answer a ringing doorbell. Ms. Brown and her husband imagined that homebound people would feel safer at home if they had a way to see through the front door and interrogate a visitor and, if necessary, activate an alarm to alert the police that help was needed. Envisioning a set of peepholes, microphones, and a closed-circuit television, they created the first modern home security system. A monitor installed in the home or bedroom of the resident allowed ease of viewing and enabled the resident to speak to someone outside the door. Ms. Brown and her husband were awarded a patent in 1969 for this system.

Like many people who use imagination to stimulate innovation, Ms. Brown found herself far ahead of her time. In the 1960s, closed circuit TV was considered a military application, and home builders found the cost of the system to be too high. However, having the forethought to register their design and seek a patent, they provided the “prior art” that later stimulated over 30 patents.

What helps build the pathway from science to imagination to innovation begins with an idea that addresses an important problem. Imagination complements science, making it possible to see what science enables. Achieving the full promise of innovation again requires a dose of science because leveraging what is already known to what could possibly be is what brings an imagined future into an innovative reality. It takes imagination to sketch out a future, and even more imagination to find (or build) the elements needed to make that future real.

NLM stands as a partner in your imaginative journey. Keep practicing and let us know how we can help you innovate the future you can imagine!

To the Nurses Today… And The Nurses Yet To Be

In early May, I had the pleasure of giving the virtual commencement speech to the graduating class of the University of Illinois College of Nursing. It was an honor to speak to the next generation of nurses as they step into a world forever changed by the COVID-19 pandemic. In a normal year, it takes hard work to complete a nursing degree; during a pandemic, it takes extra dedication to pursue your studies online.

As a nurse myself, I’m proud of the accomplishments of these 400 new nurses and look forward to providing them with resources and information as they start the next phase of their career, and for many years to come.

Please join me in wishing a warm welcome to these new graduates as they enter a world that needs and appreciates the hard work of nurses more than ever.

Video Transcript (below):

I’m Patti Brennan, Director of the National Library of Medicine. I want to add my congratulations to the choruses of friends, families, and colleagues on your accomplishments being acknowledged this day of the graduation at the University of Illinois College of Nursing.

Almost 200 of you are entering the profession for the first time, and another 200 are receiving graduate degrees in recognition of your advanced education in nursing specializations.

I want to speak today to the nurses who you are right now, the nurses who you will become, and the nurses who you will need, and finally to the nurses,  yet unborn,  who will serve society in the future.

To the nurses who you are today:  

Your nursing education experience was like no other over the past 100 years!  You’ve learned how to learn via Zoom and TikTok, transform nursing interventions into telemedicine delivery, and develop novel skills engaging patients not only as informants but as partners in care. One of the few positive outcomes of this coronavirus pandemic is the societal recognition of the essential value and contributions of nursing. So, you are entering a world that both needs you greatly and is readily accepting of the contributions you could make. 

I hope you will take with you the joy of friendships you made during your educational time here at U of I College of Nursing: the excitement of learning, the meaningful contributions of patients who accompanied you on your learning journey, and the hope that suffused your faculty members as they guided you on your journey. I trust that the foundation of your education here will give you a firm basis, grounding you in trust, supporting your explorations.

You are entering a world that needs nursing more than ever before. I urge you to use the professional education you have had to support doing the urgent tasks in front of you while remaining true to nursing’s social contract. The hallmark of a professional is doing a task that looks like something someone else could do, but is done with the sophistication of specialized knowledge and skill that grows from the deep foundation, the future vision, and the broad perspective that we draw from our profession. It’s not enough to act, we must BE nurses.

To the nurses you will be in 2031:

What do you see when you look back across the decade since graduation? Have you achieved pay equity? Did you accomplish the next level of education that you envisioned as you completed your degree today? Did you find satisfaction and depth in the area of nursing you originally selected, or did you explore several areas before finding your niche? Or maybe, did you find a way to express the values and knowledge of nursing through another profession such as law or design? Wherever you are in ten years, I hope you look back in wonder, awe, gratitude, and satisfaction.

How does the world around you look in 2031? Has our treatment of Mother Earth improved so that the UN’s 17 Goals for Sustainable Development have actually been met? Have we achieved social equity and removed health disparities engendered by structural racism? Was the coronavirus pandemic the last pandemic of the decade or was it the start of a pandemic decade? Has someone made driverless cars practical or figured out how to get rid of all of those cords on our computers?

To the nurses you will need in 2071:

Right now, I’m just about the age that you will be in 2071. I am so confident of the importance of our profession to society and of our value to it that I am sure there will be nurses out there in the future ready to serve society.

These are the nurses who will be there to care for you—I will be long gone by then. So, I’m going express my hopes for the ways nurses approach patient care and knowledge discovery with some personal reflections. 

I hope that these nurses will remember that confidence is often accompanied by uncertainty, and that nurses must consider both as they diagnose and treat the human response to living.  

I hope they will remember that many of my age want nurses to know that we feel like we did 30 years ago, think we look like they did 20 years ago, have had meaningful and interesting career and life contributions, and bring the wisdom of aging and the freedom of age. All of this makes us even more desiring of good nursing care. Nurses should let us know how to find them, how to recognize them, and how to benefit from their expertise.

I’m less afraid of dying than I was earlier in my life in part because I feel like I could live forever, or at least another 30 years, in good health with the love and support of my friends and family.

I want the nurses who care for you when you are my age to respect that goal of mine and use it to shape their practices. Like the future you, know that even now I want your guidance to help me live as fully as I can.

I don’t want nurses to be afraid to bring up hard topics—social disruption, social isolation, loss, loneliness, hopes—because all of these shape how we approach my health. We can be better partners if nurses are as brave as we need them to be.

To the nurses of 2121 yet unborn:

These are the nurses who will be there to bring nursing into the future. What legacy will you leave them? How will you help shape the future nurse? What can you do to create in them the very excitement that you feel today?

Can you share your experiences, remove barriers, open pathways of influence, give them shoulders to stand on? Can you help those nurses yet unborn know that it is better to ask a question than to answer any single question?

Can you inspire them to discover and not just remember? And more importantly, can you help them build partnerships and pathways with people who bring the best of nursing to complement and extend the best that is in that person?

What can you do to prepare the world for nursing? To make the very best practice environment for nursing? What ways can you engage with architects, home builders, city planners to make the world not only a place that nurses LIVE in, but is livable because of nursing? Over 30 years ago, a great nurse thinker identified that it is a critical function of nursing to create an environment that supports development. What will you do to build that environment so that the nurses of 2121 can live as nurses, being nurses?

Congratulations and celebrations to all of you—faculty, students, administrators, family, and friends. Another journey is complete, and another is starting.

Reflect, Reimagine, Reenergize TOGETHER

Guest post by Patricia Flatley Brennan, Director, NLM; Dianne Babski, Associate Director for Library Operations, NLM; and Amanda J. Wilson, Chief of the Office of Engagement and Training, NLM.

Welcome to NLM @ MLA ’21 vConference! This year, for the Medical Library Association (MLA) virtual meeting, we organized NLM’s activities around three themes:

  1. Reflect on the impact of the past year,
  2. Reimagine our work to make what we do better, and
  3. Reenergize by reconnecting with NLM colleagues and embracing the new normal! 

This year offered many opportunities to pause and reflect. We were struck by the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, the global response of lockdowns, personal adoption of public health measures, and more than 1.7 billion vaccine doses already administered worldwide. Our reflections led us to a reaffirmation of the importance of medical libraries as a source of trusted health information and the critical need for work-life balance in everyone’s lives. Like others around the world, we looked on in horror and dismay at repeated episodes of violence and injustice inflicted upon communities of color. We hope that our partners around the country will join the momentum surrounding the NIH UNITE initiative to end structural racism and racial inequalities in the health research enterprise.

The maximum telework posture of NLM and many other industries prompted reimagining our work life now and in the future. We structured many of our NLM @ MLA ’21 presentations to share our experiences of working at a distance, video conferencing, and providing library services during a time when the physical doors of libraries are closed.

We hope that the opportunity to gather in spirit, rather than in person, brings the reenergizing atmosphere that often comes with greeting old friends and meeting new colleagues. We hope you’ll take advantage of the opportunities to gather around professional conversations and social engagement.

NLM at the Medical Library Association 2021 vConference

NLM’s participation at the MLA ’21 vConference began on May 17th and will continue through May 27th. One of the advantages of a virtual symposium is that you’re not restricted to viewing a session once – all NLM sessions will be available online after May 27th.

NLM began this year’s conference with a full day symposium introducing the 2021-2026 Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM). The day started with a celebration of NNLM accomplishments to date, particularly over the last 5 years. This session attracted more than 250 attendees who reflected on where NLM has been. For example, do you know the highest number of regions that the NNLM ever had? Was it 9, 11, or 50? Or, how much outreach funding NNLM awarded to communities in the last year? Over or under $1 million? This session also provided an overview of how the Network has been reimagined for the 2021-2026 cooperative agreement, and is being reenergized though exciting and innovative programming and projects. Find these answers and what else is in store for the Network on the NNLM @ MLA day page!

During last week’s dedicated exhibit time, we hosted 33 one-hour Meet the Experts sessions, involving over 50 speakers covering a wide range of topics including data science practice, PubMed and PubMed Central, tools for scholarly publishing, the 2020-2021 Associate Fellows cohort and projects, intramural training at NLM, consumer health resources, health data standards, and many more – whew! The “NNLM Reading Club: A Vehicle for Starting Health Conversations” took top marks for being the most popular session.

We also provided special highlights of NLM’s response to COVID-19 in the Exhibitor Solution Showcase. NLM’s Dina Demner-Fushman, MD, PhD, Valerie Florance, PhD, Yanli Wang, MD, PhD, Amanda Wilson, MSLS, and Robin Taylor, MLIS, presented on topics such as TREC-COVID, a competition applying national language processing to resolve challenges related to COVID-19; the Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics projects designed to speed COVID-19 testing, and to identify new ways of detecting COVID-19 in people and in the environment (think of an electronic nose or waste water sampling); the Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 Infection Initiative, now known as ReCOVer; and how common data elements are making the data acquired through COVID-19 studies harmonized and available for researchers in the future. 

Teresa Zayas Cabán, PhD, NLM’s Assistant Director for Policy Development, presented updates and priorities from NLM and NIH at the Legislative Update session, and, not-for-profit Stop Foodborne Illness executive, Mitzi D. Baum, MS, delivered remarks on the topic of public health and food safety as the keynote speaker for this year’s Joseph Leiter NLM/MLA Lectureship. You can take a deep dive into the NLM@MLA’21 website where you can find links to the 2021 Leiter Lecture recording; NLM and NNLM On-Demand Presentations, Lightning Talks; Immersion Sessions; biographies for NLM and NNLM staff participating in the Meet the Experts sessions; and more!

As we close out our participation in the MLA ’21 vConference, our last don’t miss events are:

  • Take a Break with Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan on May 26 at 6 pm (CT). Join Dr. Brennan for a signature trivia evening break. Join Us!
  • The ever-popular, annual NLM Update, May 27 at 10:15 am (CT), this year featuring NLM Director Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD; Associate Director for Library Operations Dianne Babski; and Acting Director, Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, Olivier Bodenreider, MD, PhD.

Reflect. Reimagine. Reenergize.

As we reflect on our experience at the MLA ’21 vConference, our interactions with colleagues has provided even more insight to reimagine our work to make what we do better, and reenergize as we embrace the new normal!

Which element of this year’s theme do you relate to most? Why?

(left to right)
Dianne Babski, Associate Director for Library Operations at NLM
Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD, NLM Director
Amanda J. Wilson, Chief, Office of Engagement and Training at NLM