Informing Success from the Outside In: Introducing the NLM Board of Regents CGR Working Group

Guest post by Valerie Schneider, PhD, staff scientist at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and Kristi Holmes, PhD, Director of Galter Health Sciences Library & Learning Center and Professor of Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

Last year, we described how NLM is developing the NIH Comparative Genomics Resource (CGR)—a project that offers content, tools, and interfaces for genomic data resources associated with eukaryotic research organisms—in two blog posts:

Eukaryote refers to any single-celled or multicellular organisms whose cell contains a distinct and membrane-bound nucleus. Since eukaryotes all likely evolved from the same common ancestry, studying them can grant us insight into how other eukaryotes—including those in humans—work and makes CGR and its resources that much more important to eukaryotic research.

CGR aims to:

  • Promote high-quality eukaryotic genomic data submission.
  • Enrich NLM’s genomic-related content with community-sourced content.
  • Facilitate comparative biological analyses.
  • Support the development of the next generation of scientists.

Since our last two posts, the team at NCBI has been hard at work making important technical and content updates to and socializing CGR’s suite of tools. For instance, they published new webpages that organize genome-related data by taxonomy, making it available for browsing and immediate download. They also created the ClusteredNR Database, a new database for the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), to provide results with greater taxonomic context for sequence searches, and incorporated new gene information from the Alliance of Genome Resources, an organization that unites data and information for model organisms’ unique aspects, into Gene. NCBI is also engaging with genomics communities to understand their needs and requirements for comparative genomics through the NLM Board of Regents Comparative Genomics Working Group.

The working group is lending their perspective and extensive expertise to the project, activities that are essential to CGR’s success and development. We have charged working group members with guiding the development of a new approach to scientific discovery that relies on genomic-related data from research organisms, helping project teams keep pace with changes in the field, and understanding the scientific community’s needs and expectations for key functionalities. To do this, working group members help NLM set development priorities such as exploring CGR’s integration with existing infrastructures and related workforce development opportunities.

Projects like CGR highlight how critical interdisciplinary collaboration is to modern research and how success requires community perspectives and involvement. Working group members will be sharing more information about this project at upcoming conferences and in biomedical literature, and our team at NCBI will also share events and resources through our NIH Comparative Genomics Resource website.

If you are a member of a model organism community, are working on emerging eukaryotic research models, or support eukaryotic genomic data—whether you are a researcher, educator, student, scholarly society member, librarian, data scientist, database resource manager, developer, epidemiologist, or other stakeholder in our progress—we encourage you to reach out and get involved. Here are a few suggestions:

  • Invite us to join you at a conference, teach a workshop, partner on a webinar, or discuss other ideas you may have to foster information sharing and feedback.
  • Use and share CGR’s suite of tools and share your feedback.
  • Be on the lookout for project updates and events on the CGR website or follow @NCBI on Twitter.

We’re always excited to get feedback through CGR listening sessions and user testing for tool and resource updates. Email cgr@nlm.nih.gov to learn all the ways you can participate.

Thank you to the members of the NLM Board of Regents CGR Working Group!

Alejandro Sanchez Alvarado, PhD

Executive Director and Chief Scientific Officer
Priscilla Wood Neaves Chair in the Biomedical Sciences
Stowers Institute for Medical for Medical Research

Hannah Carey, PhD
Professor, Department of Comparative Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Wayne Frankel, PhD
Professor, Department of Genetics & Development
Director of Preclinical Models, Institute of Genomic Medicine
Columbia University Medical Center

Kristi L. Holmes, PhD (Chair)
Director, Galter Health Services Library & Learning Center
Professor of Preventive Medicine (Health & Biomedical Informatics)
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Ani W. Manichaikul, PhD
Associate Professor, Center for Public Health Genomics
University of Virginia School of Medicine

Len Pennacchio, PhD
Senior Scientist
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Valerie Schneider, PhD (Executive Secretary)
Program Head, Sequence Enhancements, Tools and Delivery (SeqPlus)
HHS/NIH/NLM/NCBI

Kenneth Stuart, PhD
Professor, Center of Global Infectious Disease Research
Seattle Children’s Research Institute

Tandy Warnow, PhD
Grainger Distinguished Chair in Engineering
Associate Head of Computer Science
University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana

Rick Woychik, PhD (NIH CGR Steering Committee Liaison)
Director, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Toxicology Program (NTP)

Cathy Wu, PhD
Unidel Edward G. Jefferson Chair in Engineering and Computer Science
Director, Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology
Director, Data Science Institute
University of Delaware

Dr. Schneider is the deputy director of Sequence Offerings and the head of the Sequence Plus program. In these roles, she coordinates efforts associated with the curation, enhancement, and organization of sequence data, as well as oversees tools and resources that enable the public to access, analyze, and visualize biomedical data. She also manages NCBI’s involvement in the Genome Reference Consortium, which is the international collaboration tasked with maintaining the value of the human reference genome assembly.

Dr. Holmes is dedicated to empowering discovery and equitable access to knowledge through the development of computational and social architectures to support these goals. She also serves on the leadership team of the Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.

What is the Role of a Mentor?

Guest post by Karmen S. Williams, DrPH, MBA, Assistant Professor at City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, and Meera G. Subash, MD, Assistant Professor and Division Quality Officer for the Division of Rheumatology at the University of Texas Health Science Center, McGovern Medical School.

“Everyone, at every point in their career, has the potential to be a mentor as well as [to] seek a mentor. It is the combination of being and doing in mentorship that makes it such a rewarding and important part of a professional career.”

Medical informatics pioneer and NLM Director Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD, recently spoke these words when she joined us for a special podcast hosted by the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA)—a crossover episode between For Your Informatics, led by the Women in AMIA Initiative, and ACIF Go-Live, directed by the AMIA Clinical Informatics Fellows.

Bryan McConomy, MD, began our inaugural episode with an introduction to medical informatics, highlighting the early work of Dr. G. Octo Barnett and his team’s development of the MUMPS integrated programming language at Massachusetts General Hospital in the 1960s. Being a relatively young field, we can look to the trailblazers who first used computers to augment clinical decision-making and improve health care discovery and delivery. We pay homage to the rich tapestry of innovative leaders and educators, such as Homer Warner, MD, PhD; Reed Gardner, PhD; Clement McDonald, MD; Margo Cook, RN; Lawrence Weed, MD; and Edward Shortliffe, MD, PhD, to name a few.

We started the History of Medical Informatics joint podcast series with those two AMIA podcasts with the understanding that we need to connect our past with the present. This ongoing series catalogs this history through the eyes of pioneers in the field of health informatics. By highlighting how historical events merge with contemporary topics of interest in health informatics, we intend to strengthen the bridge for new and upcoming professionals both in and outside of informatics.

In our episode titled “History of Medical Informatics – Mentorship” with Dr. Brennan, we focus on how mentorship was established in a field that, until recently, was virtually nonexistent. Dr. Brennan was not only our first guest on the joint series, but she was also featured in a March 2020 episode of For Your Informatics titled “Training the Next Generation of Informaticians,” which also offers valuable information on mentorship. She has been a full-circle guest by highlighting the past, present, and future of mentorship in health informatics.

Dr. Brennan will also be our keynote speaker at this week’s 2022 AMIA Clinical Informatics Conference, which will give us an opportunity to reflect on the real meaning of mentorship. What is mentorship? How did health informatics pioneers build mentorship in a new and novel field? What is the role of a mentor?

Dr. Brennan recalls some of the best parts of her mentorship experience, including having the freedom to explore, engage with like-minded individuals, establish trust, push boundaries beyond your starting point, and open new doors. Mentors are there for your failures in life, for the deeply embarrassing moments, and to help pick you up when you hit a bump in your career.

However, not all mentorships are created equal. There are some that are lifelong, while some are short term. Some aren’t always mutually beneficial, while others are mutually uplifting. Some mentors come from other fields, while others may be in the same field. The commitment to mentorship may be formalized or just a passing activity.

The style of mentorship can also vary. Some may bring a mentee into a research group to work side by side with them while some may only have periodic conversations. Either way, the mentor must be ready and willing to go through the process.

We’d like to share some wisdom we’ve received over the years: seek out people for a cup of coffee and find someone with whom you can share your successes and challenges. This is important because not all skills are learned in the classroom. For example, academicians need to know how to interpret faculty governance, engage with management, and position research and teaching. Dr. Brennan points out that “these things are difficult to learn on your own, and that’s where mentors can come in.”

The point is that mentorship must be purposeful and built on the trust needed to guide the direction of mentees’ careers and important life choices. It is a decision that should not be taken lightly. Mentorship in any arena is pertinent to career development, but it is especially valuable in groundbreaking fields like health informatics.

What is the best advice you’ve received from a mentor?

Headshot of Dr. Karmen S. Williams.

Dr. Williams completed a post-doctorate fellowship in public and population health informatics at Indiana University and Regenstrief Institute, where she focused on systemic informatics integration. Dr. Williams serves as the director of AMIA’s For Your Informatics podcast, which features individuals at all career stages to reveal the diverse world of biomedical and health informatics professions. She is a member of the AMIA Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee; Women in AMIA Pathways Subcommittee; and AMIA Dental Informatics Working Group.

Headshot of Dr. Meera G. Subash.

Dr. Subash received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and her medical degree from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine. She continued to University of California San Francisco to complete both her Rheumatology and Clinical Informatics Fellowships. She is Epic Physician Builder certified, and her interest area is implementing and evaluating health IT and electronic health record tools to improve patient care in rheumatology and ambulatory care.

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