To the Nurses Today… And The Nurses Yet To Be

In early May, I had the pleasure of giving the virtual commencement speech to the graduating class of the University of Illinois College of Nursing. It was an honor to speak to the next generation of nurses as they step into a world forever changed by the COVID-19 pandemic. In a normal year, it takes hard work to complete a nursing degree; during a pandemic, it takes extra dedication to pursue your studies online.

As a nurse myself, I’m proud of the accomplishments of these 400 new nurses and look forward to providing them with resources and information as they start the next phase of their career, and for many years to come.

Please join me in wishing a warm welcome to these new graduates as they enter a world that needs and appreciates the hard work of nurses more than ever.

Video Transcript (below):

I’m Patti Brennan, Director of the National Library of Medicine. I want to add my congratulations to the choruses of friends, families, and colleagues on your accomplishments being acknowledged this day of the graduation at the University of Illinois College of Nursing.

Almost 200 of you are entering the profession for the first time, and another 200 are receiving graduate degrees in recognition of your advanced education in nursing specializations.

I want to speak today to the nurses who you are right now, the nurses who you will become, and the nurses who you will need, and finally to the nurses,  yet unborn,  who will serve society in the future.

To the nurses who you are today:  

Your nursing education experience was like no other over the past 100 years!  You’ve learned how to learn via Zoom and TikTok, transform nursing interventions into telemedicine delivery, and develop novel skills engaging patients not only as informants but as partners in care. One of the few positive outcomes of this coronavirus pandemic is the societal recognition of the essential value and contributions of nursing. So, you are entering a world that both needs you greatly and is readily accepting of the contributions you could make. 

I hope you will take with you the joy of friendships you made during your educational time here at U of I College of Nursing: the excitement of learning, the meaningful contributions of patients who accompanied you on your learning journey, and the hope that suffused your faculty members as they guided you on your journey. I trust that the foundation of your education here will give you a firm basis, grounding you in trust, supporting your explorations.

You are entering a world that needs nursing more than ever before. I urge you to use the professional education you have had to support doing the urgent tasks in front of you while remaining true to nursing’s social contract. The hallmark of a professional is doing a task that looks like something someone else could do, but is done with the sophistication of specialized knowledge and skill that grows from the deep foundation, the future vision, and the broad perspective that we draw from our profession. It’s not enough to act, we must BE nurses.

To the nurses you will be in 2031:

What do you see when you look back across the decade since graduation? Have you achieved pay equity? Did you accomplish the next level of education that you envisioned as you completed your degree today? Did you find satisfaction and depth in the area of nursing you originally selected, or did you explore several areas before finding your niche? Or maybe, did you find a way to express the values and knowledge of nursing through another profession such as law or design? Wherever you are in ten years, I hope you look back in wonder, awe, gratitude, and satisfaction.

How does the world around you look in 2031? Has our treatment of Mother Earth improved so that the UN’s 17 Goals for Sustainable Development have actually been met? Have we achieved social equity and removed health disparities engendered by structural racism? Was the coronavirus pandemic the last pandemic of the decade or was it the start of a pandemic decade? Has someone made driverless cars practical or figured out how to get rid of all of those cords on our computers?

To the nurses you will need in 2071:

Right now, I’m just about the age that you will be in 2071. I am so confident of the importance of our profession to society and of our value to it that I am sure there will be nurses out there in the future ready to serve society.

These are the nurses who will be there to care for you—I will be long gone by then. So, I’m going express my hopes for the ways nurses approach patient care and knowledge discovery with some personal reflections. 

I hope that these nurses will remember that confidence is often accompanied by uncertainty, and that nurses must consider both as they diagnose and treat the human response to living.  

I hope they will remember that many of my age want nurses to know that we feel like we did 30 years ago, think we look like they did 20 years ago, have had meaningful and interesting career and life contributions, and bring the wisdom of aging and the freedom of age. All of this makes us even more desiring of good nursing care. Nurses should let us know how to find them, how to recognize them, and how to benefit from their expertise.

I’m less afraid of dying than I was earlier in my life in part because I feel like I could live forever, or at least another 30 years, in good health with the love and support of my friends and family.

I want the nurses who care for you when you are my age to respect that goal of mine and use it to shape their practices. Like the future you, know that even now I want your guidance to help me live as fully as I can.

I don’t want nurses to be afraid to bring up hard topics—social disruption, social isolation, loss, loneliness, hopes—because all of these shape how we approach my health. We can be better partners if nurses are as brave as we need them to be.

To the nurses of 2121 yet unborn:

These are the nurses who will be there to bring nursing into the future. What legacy will you leave them? How will you help shape the future nurse? What can you do to create in them the very excitement that you feel today?

Can you share your experiences, remove barriers, open pathways of influence, give them shoulders to stand on? Can you help those nurses yet unborn know that it is better to ask a question than to answer any single question?

Can you inspire them to discover and not just remember? And more importantly, can you help them build partnerships and pathways with people who bring the best of nursing to complement and extend the best that is in that person?

What can you do to prepare the world for nursing? To make the very best practice environment for nursing? What ways can you engage with architects, home builders, city planners to make the world not only a place that nurses LIVE in, but is livable because of nursing? Over 30 years ago, a great nurse thinker identified that it is a critical function of nursing to create an environment that supports development. What will you do to build that environment so that the nurses of 2121 can live as nurses, being nurses?

Congratulations and celebrations to all of you—faculty, students, administrators, family, and friends. Another journey is complete, and another is starting.

40 Years of Progress: It’s Time to End the HIV Epidemic

Guest post by Maureen M. Goodenow, PhD, Associate Director for AIDS Research and Director, Office of AIDS Research, National Institutes of Health

On June 5th, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of AIDS Research (OAR) joined colleagues worldwide to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the landmark 1981 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) that first recognized the syndrome of diseases later named AIDS. June 5th also marks HIV Long-Term Survivors Awareness Day. 

Forty years ago, the CDC’s MMWR described five people who were diagnosed with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia—catalyzing a global effort that led to the identification of AIDS, and later, the virus that causes AIDS.

Over the years, much of the progress to guide the response to HIV has emerged from research funded by the NIH, and helped turn a once fatal disease into a now manageable chronic illness. This progress is attributable in large part to the nation’s longstanding HIV leadership and contributions at home and abroad.

NIH is taking action to recognize the milestones achieved through science, pay tribute to more than 32 million people who have died from AIDS-related illness globally (including 700,000 Americans), and support the goal of Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. (EHE) and worldwide. OAR is coordinating with NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices (ICOs) to share messaging that will continue through NIH’s World AIDS Day commemoration on December 1, 2021.

The NIH remains committed to supporting basic, clinical, and translational research to develop cutting-edge solutions for the ongoing challenges of the HIV epidemic. The scientific community has achieved groundbreaking advances in the understanding of basic virology, human immunology, and HIV pathogenesis and has led the development of safe, effective antiretroviral medications and effective interventions to prevent HIV acquisition and transmission.

Nevertheless, HIV remains a serious public health issue.

NIH established the OAR in 1988 to ensure that NIH HIV/AIDS research funding is directed at the highest priority research areas, and to facilitate maximum return on the investment. OAR’s mission is accomplished in partnership within the NIH through the ICs that plan and implement specific HIV programs or projects, coordinated by the NIH HIV/AIDS Executive Committee. As I reflect on our progress against HIV/AIDS, I would like to note the collaboration, cooperation, innovation, and other activities across the NIH ICOs in accelerating HIV/AIDS research.

Key scientific advances using novel methods and technologies have emerged in the priority areas of the NIH HIV research portfolio. Many of these advances stem from NIH-funded efforts, and all point to important directions for the NIH HIV research agenda in the coming years, particularly in the areas of new formulations of current drugs, new delivery systems, dual use of drugs for treatment and prevention, and new classes of drugs with novel strategies to treat viruses with resistance to current drug regimens.

Further development of long-lasting HIV prevention measures and treatments remains at the forefront of the NIH research portfolio on HIV/AIDS research.

NIH-funded investigators continue to uncover new details about the virus life cycle, which is crucial for the development of next generation HIV treatment approaches. Additionally, the NIH is focused on developing novel diagnostics to detect the virus as early as possible after infection.

Results in the next two years from ongoing NIH-supported HIV clinical trials will have vital implications for HIV prevention, treatment, and cure strategies going forward. For example, two NIH-funded clinical trials for HIV vaccines, Imbokodo and Mosaico, are evaluating an experimental HIV vaccine regimen designed to protect against a wide variety of global HIV strains. These studies comprise a crucial component of the NIH’s efforts to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

As we close on four decades of research, I look forward to the new advances aimed at prevention and treatment in the years to come.

You can play a role in efforts to help raise awareness and get involved with efforts to end the HIV epidemic. Visit OAR’s 40 Years of Progress: It’s Time to End the HIV Epidemic webpage, and use the toolkit of ready-to-go resources.

Dr. Goodenow leads the OAR in coordinating the NIH HIV/AIDS research agenda to end the HIV pandemic and improve the health of people with HIV. In addition, she is Chief of the Molecular HIV Host Interactions Laboratory at the NIH.

Friends of the National Library of Medicine: A Convening, Educating, and Empowering Force Supporting the Mission of NLM

Guest post by Glen P. Campbell, Chair of the Board of Directors, Friends of the National Library of Medicine

Since our founding in 1986 as a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, the Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM), have been honored to promote and support the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Our members, a coalition of individuals representing medical associations and societies, hospitals, health science libraries, corporations, and foundations, are dedicated to helping us accomplish our mission.

FNLM Mission and Goals

To promote and enhance the mission of the NLM, the FNLM convenes and celebrates thought leadership in data science, informatics, and health care communications to:

  • Advance trusted resources for data-driven research and health information
  • Promote meaningful engagement across health communities and biomedical communications enterprises
  • Build the workforce of tomorrow

In partnership with NLM, we work to achieve mutual goals that accelerate discovery, advance health in the U.S. and globally, and empower individuals with trusted health information.

Increasing public awareness and use of NLM, and supporting its many programs in research, education, and public service is our top priority. Members of the FNLM Board represent constituencies across the country and, more recently, globally. They serve without compensation—giving freely of their time and expertise.

Taking a Fresh Look

With the fifth anniversary of the appointment of Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD, as director of NLM, our Board thought it a good idea to take a fresh look at our strategic plan to ensure that we remain fully aligned with the 2017-2027 NLM Strategic Plan implemented under Dr. Brennan’s dynamic leadership. Dr. Brennan, along with the NLM Leadership team, are meeting the extraordinary challenges of the 21st century with an ambitious plan to accelerate discovery through data-driven research, expand and reach NLM constituents in new ways, and ensure that NLM’s workforce is equipped with the tools and skills required to thrive in a data-powered world.

The FNLM Strategic Task Force, under the direction of Douglas Fridsma, MD, PhD, and John Glaser, PhD, consulted with our FNLM Board, many of whom are Library users, and colleagues at NLM, and the FNLM Board approved a set of initiatives that will continue to support NLM’s Strategic Plan through two categories of initiatives: programs and events and stakeholder forums. A reorganization of our committee structure will support their successful implementation.

Expanding Education

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the FNLM’s Conference Committee, chaired by Andrew Balas, MD, PhD, Vice President, FNLM, took our conference program virtual with a series of workshops aligned with the NLM Strategic Plan. Workshops included Changing Publication Practices in the COVID-19 Era, Real World Data and Electronic Health Records in Clinical Research, and Artificial Intelligence to Accelerate Discovery. The FNLM Board approved an expansion of these workshops under a revised Education Committee to enhance the workshops with an even sharper focus on the Library’s leadership in data-powered health.  

The FNLM regularly convenes a group of publisher representatives responsible for publishing biomedical content. This Publisher’s Forum represents organizations that use a variety of publishing models including open access, subscription access, for profit and non-profit and are international, regional, or U.S. based. The group meets with the NLM leadership team and colleagues to discuss issues and concerns of common interest. The goal is to increase the understanding of how to work together as effectively as possible to bring quality health and scientific information to scientists, researchers, clinicians, and patients.

Our Board also approved new forums for medical librarians, biotechnology organizations, and NLM Fellows. The increasing interactions between NLM and among these constituencies call for even closer engagement, and the FNLM is uniquely positioned to facilitate this. 

I have only touched briefly on the significant work done by the FNLM Strategic Task Force and Board to ensure that our plan is well aligned with that of NLM. Personally, supporting the transformation of the NLM from a passive to active player in the global health care enterprise is thrilling. Our work continues, but we will be hard pressed to keep pace with Dr. Brennan and her leadership team, whose fast pace is transforming the Library day by day.

What’s Next

One final note: the FNLM’s annual Awards Gala, which celebrates and honors individuals whose contributions advanced public health, medicine, and health communications, was postponed in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. I hope you will join our next event when we bring together those involved in biomedical research and health care to recognize their support for the extraordinary work of the NLM.

Interested in learning more about our work to enhance the Library’s profile? We encourage you to visit us at FNLM.org.

Glen P. Campbell is the Chair of the Friends of the National Library of Medicine Board of Directors. He has served in this capacity for more than 10 years.

Reflect, Reimagine, Reenergize TOGETHER

Guest post by Patricia Flatley Brennan, Director, NLM; Dianne Babski, Associate Director for Library Operations, NLM; and Amanda J. Wilson, Chief of the Office of Engagement and Training, NLM.

Welcome to NLM @ MLA ’21 vConference! This year, for the Medical Library Association (MLA) virtual meeting, we organized NLM’s activities around three themes:

  1. Reflect on the impact of the past year,
  2. Reimagine our work to make what we do better, and
  3. Reenergize by reconnecting with NLM colleagues and embracing the new normal! 

This year offered many opportunities to pause and reflect. We were struck by the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, the global response of lockdowns, personal adoption of public health measures, and more than 1.7 billion vaccine doses already administered worldwide. Our reflections led us to a reaffirmation of the importance of medical libraries as a source of trusted health information and the critical need for work-life balance in everyone’s lives. Like others around the world, we looked on in horror and dismay at repeated episodes of violence and injustice inflicted upon communities of color. We hope that our partners around the country will join the momentum surrounding the NIH UNITE initiative to end structural racism and racial inequalities in the health research enterprise.

The maximum telework posture of NLM and many other industries prompted reimagining our work life now and in the future. We structured many of our NLM @ MLA ’21 presentations to share our experiences of working at a distance, video conferencing, and providing library services during a time when the physical doors of libraries are closed.

We hope that the opportunity to gather in spirit, rather than in person, brings the reenergizing atmosphere that often comes with greeting old friends and meeting new colleagues. We hope you’ll take advantage of the opportunities to gather around professional conversations and social engagement.

NLM at the Medical Library Association 2021 vConference

NLM’s participation at the MLA ’21 vConference began on May 17th and will continue through May 27th. One of the advantages of a virtual symposium is that you’re not restricted to viewing a session once – all NLM sessions will be available online after May 27th.

NLM began this year’s conference with a full day symposium introducing the 2021-2026 Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM). The day started with a celebration of NNLM accomplishments to date, particularly over the last 5 years. This session attracted more than 250 attendees who reflected on where NLM has been. For example, do you know the highest number of regions that the NNLM ever had? Was it 9, 11, or 50? Or, how much outreach funding NNLM awarded to communities in the last year? Over or under $1 million? This session also provided an overview of how the Network has been reimagined for the 2021-2026 cooperative agreement, and is being reenergized though exciting and innovative programming and projects. Find these answers and what else is in store for the Network on the NNLM @ MLA day page!

During last week’s dedicated exhibit time, we hosted 33 one-hour Meet the Experts sessions, involving over 50 speakers covering a wide range of topics including data science practice, PubMed and PubMed Central, tools for scholarly publishing, the 2020-2021 Associate Fellows cohort and projects, intramural training at NLM, consumer health resources, health data standards, and many more – whew! The “NNLM Reading Club: A Vehicle for Starting Health Conversations” took top marks for being the most popular session.

We also provided special highlights of NLM’s response to COVID-19 in the Exhibitor Solution Showcase. NLM’s Dina Demner-Fushman, MD, PhD, Valerie Florance, PhD, Yanli Wang, MD, PhD, Amanda Wilson, MSLS, and Robin Taylor, MLIS, presented on topics such as TREC-COVID, a competition applying national language processing to resolve challenges related to COVID-19; the Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics projects designed to speed COVID-19 testing, and to identify new ways of detecting COVID-19 in people and in the environment (think of an electronic nose or waste water sampling); the Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 Infection Initiative, now known as ReCOVer; and how common data elements are making the data acquired through COVID-19 studies harmonized and available for researchers in the future. 

Teresa Zayas Cabán, PhD, NLM’s Assistant Director for Policy Development, presented updates and priorities from NLM and NIH at the Legislative Update session, and, not-for-profit Stop Foodborne Illness executive, Mitzi D. Baum, MS, delivered remarks on the topic of public health and food safety as the keynote speaker for this year’s Joseph Leiter NLM/MLA Lectureship. You can take a deep dive into the NLM@MLA’21 website where you can find links to the 2021 Leiter Lecture recording; NLM and NNLM On-Demand Presentations, Lightning Talks; Immersion Sessions; biographies for NLM and NNLM staff participating in the Meet the Experts sessions; and more!

As we close out our participation in the MLA ’21 vConference, our last don’t miss events are:

  • Take a Break with Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan on May 26 at 6 pm (CT). Join Dr. Brennan for a signature trivia evening break. Join Us!
  • The ever-popular, annual NLM Update, May 27 at 10:15 am (CT), this year featuring NLM Director Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD; Associate Director for Library Operations Dianne Babski; and Acting Director, Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, Olivier Bodenreider, MD, PhD.

Reflect. Reimagine. Reenergize.

As we reflect on our experience at the MLA ’21 vConference, our interactions with colleagues has provided even more insight to reimagine our work to make what we do better, and reenergize as we embrace the new normal!

Which element of this year’s theme do you relate to most? Why?

(left to right)
Dianne Babski, Associate Director for Library Operations at NLM
Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD, NLM Director
Amanda J. Wilson, Chief, Office of Engagement and Training at NLM

Diversity Catalysts: Attracting Talent to NLM and NIH

Guest post by David Landsman, PhD, Senior Investigator, Computational Biology Branch in NLM’s National Center for Biotechnology Information and Kathel Dunn, PhD, Associate Fellowship Coordinator, NLM

NLM is committed to attracting, developing, and retaining diverse library and scientific talent. Professional development at NLM yields completed research, publications, and entrée to a network that extends to NIH, the academic community, and industry at large. In the collective management of NLM training programs, we are aware of the ability of an NLM fellowship or residency to advance a person’s career. Our challenge is recruiting diverse talent to NLM and ensuring that our training environments contribute to their success. We’re also keenly aware of the power of being selected by NLM, and we take our role in exercising that power seriously by developing recruitment strategies that extend beyond our own networks, tapping into the networks of our trainees, and in pipeline programs.

In 2014, NLM joined an NIH-wide initiative within the Office of Scientific Workforce Diversity (SWD) to enhance the scientific workforce. One of its programs, Diversity Catalysts, engages NIH Institutes and Centers to develop and pilot new, evidence-based approaches to enhancing diversity throughout NIH.

Through the Diversity Catalysts program, NLM has participated in shaping an implicit-bias education module that has been rolled out to all staff across NIH. We’ve integrated portions of the SWD-developed recruitment search protocol into our own recruitment strategies. We’ve put this training to good use in the hiring mechanisms and practices within the training programs at NLM, as well as mechanisms to hire highly qualified principal investigators and training staff.

Recruiting for the future is now.

The trainees, who will join us in 2036 for the 200th anniversary of the founding of NLM, are currently 10 years old. They were born on the cusp of the United States becoming a majority-minority country. They spent their tenth year at home, living through a pandemic. Furthermore, our future trainees will come to us stamped by the technology of online education and a freedom gained through science and technology development. We’re engaging in discussions about how to welcome them at NLM. We’re looking for ways to capture and engage around the unique and differing experiences of the pandemic: some of our future trainees may have been at home participating in online learning; others may have lost a year of education completely.

What we’re doing now is keeping track of our diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts by reviewing our recruiting and interview practices to ensure that they are free of bias, promoting trainee attendance at diversity, equity, and inclusion trainings offered by NIH’s Office of Intramural Training and Education, and continuing our practice of conducting regular individual and cohort debriefs to learn how we can improve our programs.   

NLM stands with NIH to end structural racism in biomedical research.

Through the NIH’s UNITE initiative, we are working together to establish new ways to support diversity, equity, and inclusion, and identify and dismantle any policies that may harm our workforce and our science. We actively support trainees’ participation in the UNITE initiative and have noticed genuine interest among our trainees in wanting to engage and be a part of the institutional change.

NLM offers scientific training programs for high school students, bachelor’s students, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, and fellowships for librarians, historians, and history-minded researchers from a range of disciplines, from the fields of medicine, anthropology, and literature, to philosophy, law, and the arts, and many more. We promote the opportunity to study at NLM, as well as share the successes of our trainees. We use the visibility afforded to NLM to highlight trainees and believe that the power of attraction plays an undeniable role in bringing talent to NLM. However, that’s not enough. We know we must do the intentional work of making connections, extending invitations, and following up with potential candidates. We must let them know what we see in them: future scientists, librarians, historical thinkers, and leaders.

Throughout the next 15 years, as 2036 grows near, we will continue to build on our ability to attract and retain diverse candidates.

Our challenge remains to advance a strong institutional commitment to attract a diverse workforce to the NLM administrative, librarian, and scientific programs with increased outreach and, by example, extending our experience to the education of NLM staff in making best practice hiring decisions.

David Landsman, PhD serves as one of NLM’s representative to the NIH Diversity Catalysts. He is also a senior investigator at NLM with a special interest in the merging of results obtained in computational biology analyses with those derived from experiments in biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics

Kathel Dunn, PhD serves as one of NLM’s representative to the NIH Diversity Catalysts. She is also NLM’s Associate Fellowship Coordinator where she is responsible for oversight of the Associate Fellowship Program curriculum, recruiting for the Program, and providing mentorship and guidance for the Associate Fellows.