Please Join Us in Honoring Milton Corn, MD

This blog post is based on remarks given at the May 17 Milton Corn Memorial Concert.

Yesterday, I was honored to join in a beautiful celebration for the life of Dr. Milton Corn, an amazing man who I regarded as my adviser, colleague, and—most importantly—my friend. I would like to thank his wife Gilan and all of Milt’s friends and family for creating that wonderful moment of togetherness. Many of us knew Milt when he was Dean of the School of Medicine at Georgetown University or in his role with the National Library of Medicine, and I suspect that some even knew him as a bon vivant around town!

While I’m sure many of you can remember the moment you met Milt, I actually can’t—in my mind, it seems like he was an ever-present professional of the big data and scientific technology community! As a newly minted PhD in the late 1980s/early 1990s, I remember Milt as eminent in our field… and that was 30 years ago! I got to know Milt as part of the medical informatics community that was just emerging as a research powerhouse. Milt was a mentor to me; he reached into the visions I had for—and breathed life into—the ways technology could support patient engagement. He was always supportive, but he was also a hard questioner who wanted to know the value of the community’s investment.

Milt brought so many gifts to the field of biomedical informatics. He brought his wisdom as a physician executive to a fledgling field, applying his gentle but direct guidance to inspire research in the domain. Milt also funded my research; I remember a phone call one August afternoon over 20 years ago when Milt said, “Do you still need money for this project? Because we have some end-of-year money for you, and it’s available if you want to use it,” which of course let us advance our original ComputerLink project.

Interestingly enough, I actually know very little about Milt’s role at NLM, although I know a lot about his contributions! He joined our beloved NLM in 1990 during the first decade of applying computer technology to health care, in support of Don Lindberg’s visionary leadership. Milt served as NLM’s ambassador to the broader academic and research community as both their instigator and a supporter of many novel research ideas. Milt was in love with ideas, but he never let that love cloud his judgment or interfere with his expectation that emerging fields needed good science. He was as enchanted with a novel approach to genetic analysis as he was with securing proposals to write important books that detailed the history of medicine.

Milt became a colleague, a trusted advisor, and someone I could talk with about biomedical informatics. We could laugh about the field while enjoying its growth. Later, Milt became my friend. We shared family stories, our love for our children, and the challenges we faced with them. I loved his humor—he had the best sardonic laugh in the world. And then, surprise of all surprises, Milt became my employee, which had nothing to do with his actions, but with my actions! I remember being very mindful of Milt during my first NIH interview, where one of the committee members asked what it was going to be like for me, and I said I’m now going to be the boss of someone who I felt that I have learned from my whole career… it’s going to be fabulous!

Not that it wasn’t daunting; for 25 years, my career success depended on Milt! And he was wise: on my first day on the job, Milt stopped by with a little gift—a bag of peanut M&Ms! What a way to level the playing field. Sometime during those first few weeks, Milt came to my office and said, “Anytime you need my desk for someone else, you just let me know, and I’ll go home.” Every year he would say that sentence, and every year I thought not yet, I need you here. I couldn’t be without Milt, the magic maker.

After working more closely with Milt, I realized his judgment, discernment, and incredibly keen sense of what was a good investment—and, more importantly, what wasn’t—were critical to how NLM functioned. Later in our time at NLM, we needed a single scientific director to unify our intramural programs, and Milt took this responsibility on. Adding the title of Acting Scientific Director to his already stretched ambit, Milt aligned our two very strong intramural research groups: one addressing computational biology, and the other, clinical health informatics. He guided these two very disparate groups of investigators into a single structure… not totally unified, but respectful of each other and clearly willing to meet halfway across the bridge.

I turned to Milt many times as counselor to my position. Navigating the federal waters as director of a venerable institute like the NIH National Library of Medicine was a challenge—even for someone who thought herself quite sophisticated in dealing with complex organizations. Periodically, I’d walk over to Milt’s office, settle into one of his nice leather chairs, and lay out whatever issue I was confronting or a personality that perplexed me. Through a question or a brief comment, he led me to solutions, insights, and confidence, but none more so than the day he said, “Your job is important, and you deserve to have fun—so make sure that you do that!” I am brimming with tears as I remember how his strength made me strong!

In October of 2020, Milt told me that the pandemic was good for him. What an odd statement, I thought. However, he revealed that our maximum telework posture, with everyone working from home, eliminated the need for him to make the long commute from Virginia to Bethesda. Working from home made it possible for him to continue to engage. And engage he did! He remained a mentor all the way up until his very last weeks at the National Library of Medicine. I remember the night he called me and said, “I don’t think I can come back to work anymore,” but he reminded me, “You can call me if you need me.” I took his generous offer to heart and took it up as often as I could.

Above all, Milt was important to me, to the National Library of Medicine, and to the entire scientific and clinical world. Thank you.

Nursing in the Headlines

Every year, we celebrate National Nurses Week between May 6, which is National Nurses Day, and May 12, which happens to be Florence Nightingale’s birthday. If you haven’t picked up a specialty journal or public newspaper in the past few months, you may not know that nursing has made it to the headlines:


Some of us might argue that any press is better than none, and others might say it’s about time that the real story about nurses and nursing become better known. While I believe a little in both perspectives, the real reason I’m glad to see them today is that they depict a much richer, more valid, and more robust story about who and what nurses are and how they serve society.

A recent article in The New York Times stated, “A Shrinking Band of Southern Nurses, Neck Deep in Another Covid Wave.” This news story brings into national view the importance of small, nonprofit safety-net hospitals and the experience of the nurses who work there. Told without romanticizing nurses’ dedication or pointing out their long-suffering compassionate nature, this article tells of the real challenges faced by nurses who want to do good for their communities but are faced with persistent shortages, significant illnesses that could have been avoided, and politically motivated, bureaucratic financial decisions. However, it also tells of the creative problem solving demonstrated by these nurses as they try to meet patient needs and the compassion they provide to their colleagues as they continue, yet another day, to address the needs of many with fewer and fewer resources.

Look at the first three headlines: together, these depict a professional field dedicated to meeting the conditions of its social contract—to provide high-quality patient care—and awash with opportunities for outstanding career growth, and at the same time at risk of losing some of its critical workforce due to unrelenting stress in the workplace. What does this say about nursing? Never has there been such opportunity, but never has the opportunity promised so little.

A beautiful story in March in The New York Times, “Confronting Grief, With Margaret Atwood, in ‘The Nurse Antigone,’” which talks about regular nurses participating with Margaret Atwood in the reading of the play Antigone, provides me with hope and vision. In this rendition, Atwood will play the blind prophet Theophanes and the nurses will be part of the Greek chorus. This story of Antigone’s determination to bury her brother, who died in battle, despite a law forbidding the burial of traitors mirrors the challenges nurses face by attending to those in need despite enormous challenges in acquiring resources needed to provide care, including sufficient time. An ethicist quoted in the article remarks that Antigone’s triumph over Creon’s prohibitions provides an apt mirror of the moral injury with which nurses cope, neither romanticizing their decision nor despairing at their deplorable conditions.

The final headline in the middle of the pack heralds nurses’ awakening to their economic power. The COVID-19 pandemic didn’t create the traveling nurse sector of our profession, but it certainly accelerated its growth across the country. Individual remuneration soared, leaving many nurses with the dilemma to remain as a loyal worker in a long-served institution or move on for financial gain. Hospitals too faced the challenge of differential staff compensation, with highly paid traveling nurse staff working next to more modestly paid existing staff. Fortunately, the perversity of this economic structure has led to hospitals and clinics improving staff nurse compensation, attending to their work conditions, and stabilizing the staffing complement.

As we celebrate National Nurses Week this year, please join me in recognizing the vibrant, rich picture of our profession. We are not unbuffered by these challenging times, and as a profession, we are responding in a way that serves our patients while preserving our profession. Accepting new models of care, innovative career trajectories, and an expanded understanding of how to create compassionate workplaces promises a future in which all nurses can work to the top of their licenses. Let us know how we can help you do this, too!

MLA ’22: NLM as an Engine for Innovation and Discovery

Guest post by Amanda J. Wilson, Chief of the NLM Office of Engagement and Training (OET), and Dianne Babski, Associate Director for Library Operations.

NLM is excited to participate in the annual Medical Library Association (MLA) conference MLA ’22: Reconnect, Renew, Reflect, held virtually from April 27 to May 2 and on-site in New Orleans from May 3 to 6.

Information on how NLM products, services, and programs support innovation and discovery is available at NLM @ MLA’22. We encourage to you visit the NLM Technical Showcases on May 5 for a PubMed update with Amanda Sawyer, an introduction to NIH Data Management and Sharing Policy from Dr. Lisa Federer, and a PubMed Central update and information about NIH preprints with Katie Funk. The NLM Update on May 6 with Dianne Babski, Amanda Wilson, and Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) Project Director Martha Meacham will include the latest activities and be followed by an interactive Q&A.

If you missed the April 28 session, check out the NNLM Day @ MLA: National Update page to hear about NNLM members’ work and accomplishments over the past year and to learn how the regions took advantage of their new configuration, partnerships, upcoming activities, and available opportunities. For example, the NNLM Center for Data Services hosted a session to help professionals implement the NIH Data Management and Sharing Policy, with concurrent sessions from the NNLM Training Office and NNLM Public Health Coordination Office. NNLM Day will reconvene in November 2022, so be sure to let us know your topics of interest.

MLA, which comprises more than 400 institutions and 3,000 professionals, is one of NLM’s key stakeholder groups that inform our products, initiatives, and services. MLA’s annual meeting offers NLM the opportunity to introduce new products and initiatives, get feedback on our services, and explore ways to better support the medical library community. As an NIH institute and a national library, NLM continually adapts to changes in the research ecosystem, including data standards, scientific developments, technological advancements, and the evolving norms of how we operate together.

As a catalyst for innovation and discovery, NLM is committed to equipping health science information professionals and the public at large with tools, platforms, and the ability to conduct today’s data-intensive research and community outreach. Please visit NLM @ MLA’22 to learn how you can become part of this partnership as we develop health information solutions and joint programs to support the future of health information.

Ms. Wilson coordinates engagement, training, and outreach staff from across NLM to elevate NLM’s presence across the United States and internationally. OET is also home to the Environmental Health Information Partnership for NLM and coordinates the Network of the National Library of Medicine.

Ms. Babski is responsible for the management of one of NLM’s largest divisions, with more than 450 staff, who provide health information services to a global audience of health care professionals, researchers, administrators, students, historians, patients, and the public.

At the Intersection of National Library and Public Health Weeks: Celebrating NLM’s Many Roles

Guest post by Robert Pines, MS, Writer/Editor, and Sarah Ashley Jolly, MPH, Writer/Editor and Graphic Designer (Contractor), NIH National Library of Medicine (NLM) Office of Communications and Public Liaison.

This week marks both National Library Week (April 3-9) and National Public Health Week (April 4-10) and we are pleased to recognize this intersection of NLM’s work. While the importance of each observance on its own is clear, their connection may not be as obvious. From our vantage point in the NLM communications office, however, we see the many roles in which NLM staff members and contractors are engaged, and how libraries and public health are linked to create a healthier world. As such, we are pleased to share just how NLM embodies this overlap in observances as a center for information innovation that supports and advances public health.

NLM is the world’s largest biomedical library and engaged in activities as diverse as our global community of users. NLM staff members and contractors are motivated by a desire to serve scientists and society, and are involved with training, community engagement, literacy campaigns, information dissemination, and more. Public health is at the core of NLM’s mission, and it drives the work we do as a library that delivers information directly to stakeholders.

“…to assist the advancement of medical and related sciences and to aid the dissemination and exchange of scientific and other information important to the progress of medicine and to the public health.

-NLM Authorizing Language

Inspired by many of the daily themes of National Public Health Week, we spoke with six colleagues representing different parts of NLM to hear — in their own words — how their work in a library contributes to public health.

Racism: A Public Health Crisis

“NLM has been an active participant in the NIH-wide UNITE Initiative, which seeks to identify and address structural racism within the NIH-supported and broader scientific community. We’ve worked to recruit change agents from across NLM to advance racial and ethnic equity through a commitment to reform our own policies, practice, and procedures. This effort is rooted in a recognition that we have a responsibility to serve as exemplars for the change we wish to see.”

Maryam Zaringhalam, PhD
Data Science and Open Science Officer, NLM Office of Strategic Initiatives

Learn about the NIH UNITE Initiative and diversity at NLM.

Public Health Workforce: Essential to our Future

“Trainees who come to NLM have a passion for advancing healthcare, and we provide an environment where they can apply their unique computational skillsets to address public health questions. Among other contributions, their work here has improved our understanding of different diseases and created systems that help other researchers and clinicians better serve their patients.”

Virginia Meyer, PhD
Training Coordinator, NLM Intramural Research Program (Contractor)

View training opportunities at NLM.

Community: Collaboration and Resilience

“NLM cultivates long-term partnerships with communities to help address challenges and opportunities around health equity and information access. For over 30 years, for example, the Environmental Health Information Partnership (EnHIP) has enhanced the capacity of minority-serving academic institutions to engage with environmental health information. EnHIP has had a great impact with almost 150 community-based projects focused on awareness and usage of NLM resources.”

Amanda J. Wilson 
Chief, NLM Office of Engagement and Training

Read about the NLM Office of Engagement and Training and its work with EnHIP.

“The Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) is committed to providing equitable access to high-quality health information. We make NLM tools and resources available to those who need them in order to build a knowledgeable, resilient health care workforce and public. Through NNLM’s work, individuals are able to make informed decisions about their health, research and public health professionals have the resources they need to make change, and the public health of the nation is improved as a result.”

Martha Meacham, MLIS, MA
Project Director, NLM Office of Engagement and Training

Discover the work of NNLM.

World Health Day: Health is a Human Right

“At MedlinePlus en Español, our team of translators facilitates access to content from NLM using thoughtful translations that consider the breadth and variability of Spanish-speaking audiences. We are proud to enable access to high-quality health information by reducing language barriers and bridging cultural gaps so consumers can make informed health decisions.”

Javier Chavez 
Team Lead, MedlinePlus en Español

Explore MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en Español.

Accessibility: Closing the Health Equity Gap

“Accessibility is critical to closing the health equity gap. NLM promotes accessibility by ensuring NLM’s videos include audio description, captions, and proper color contrast so that blind, sight-impaired, or deaf audiences can find and learn about NLM’s various tools and resources.”

Andrew Wiley 
Video Producer, NLM Office of Communications and Public Liaison (Contractor)

Photo of Andrew Wiley

Watch our audio described videos and read about accessibility at NLM.


As echoed in the words of our colleagues, NLM staff members and contractors are dedicated to providing stakeholders with the resources and information needed to create a healthier world. Their work at the intersection of these two observances demonstrates the essential nature of libraries to public health.

We hope you will join us in celebrating National Library and Public Health Weeks. Connect with NLM to learn more about the roles that we play.


Robert Pines is a writer/editor in the NLM Office of Communications and Public Liaison who works on web and digital projects. He also co-chairs the NIH Social Media Collaboration group. Robert holds a Graduate Certificate in Front-end Web Development from the Harvard Extension School, a Master of Science in Management: Public Relations from the University of Maryland University College, and a Bachelor of Arts in International Studies and Business Administration from American University.

Sarah Ashley Jolly is a full-time contractor and serves as a writer, editor, and graphic designer in the NLM Office of Communications and Public Liaison. She is passionate about creating communications materials to distill important and complex topics that are easy to understand, engaging, and visually appealing. She holds a Master’s in Public Health from Emory University with a certificate in maternal and child health, along with two Bachelors of Arts degrees in history and anthropology from Mississippi State University.

Recognizing Women in History All Year Round

Women in history — and women making history — featured in this post.
From left to right in the top row: Mary Lasker, Elizabeth Blackwell, Hope Hopps, Florence Sabin, Margaret Pittman, Patricia Palma, and Selma DeBakey. Middle row: Faye Abdellah, Deirdre Cooper Owens, Rosalind Franklin, Inez Holmes, Alice Evans, and Lois DeBakey. Bottom row: Maxine Singer, Virginia Apgar, Barbara McClintock, Sarah Stewart, Bernadine Healy, and Rana Hogarth.

Guest post by Susan L. Speaker, PhD, Historian for the Digital Manuscripts Program of the History of Medicine Division (HMD) at the NIH National Library of Medicine (NLM), and Jeffrey S. Reznick, PhD, Chief of HMD at NLM.

One important role of NLM staff is to research, curate, explain, and make available historical collection materials. In doing so, our historians, librarians, archivists, and exhibition specialists prioritize the history of underrepresented groups, stories of advocacy and change, and materials that demonstrate the relevance of history to current events. Although this Women’s History Month will soon conclude, we recognize women who have made a difference in the history of health care and medicine — as well as women who make history — year round.

NLM’s collections span ten centuries, encompass a variety of digital and physical formats, and originate from nearly every part of the globe. For many years, through a constellation of research, curation, and public programs connected to these collections, we have shared the stories of women — healers, naturalists, midwives, nurses, physicians, scientists, artists, advocates, and patients.

These individuals have included — among many others — Faye Abdellah, who became the first nurse to achieve the rank of Rear Admiral, Upper Half, a two-star rank, in the U.S. uniformed services, as well as the first nurse and woman in the 200-year history of the United States Public Health Service to hold the distinguished position of Deputy Surgeon General; Virginia Apgar, the neonatologist who developed the Apgar scoring system for evaluating newborns; and Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman to receive a Doctor of Medicine degree from an American medical school, overcoming many obstacles and establishing a foundation for American women physicians. We have also featured Selma and Lois DeBakey, icons of both medical literature preservation and communications; Bernadine Healy, the first female Director of the NIH, and Inez Holmes, World War II veteran and nurse who trained at the Piedmont Tuberculosis Sanatorium for the treatment of African American patients in Virginia.

Among the others we have recognized through our curation are geneticists Barbara McClintock and Maxine Singer; chemist and crystallographer Rosalind Franklin, whose X-ray diffraction images of DNA revealed its helical structure; embryologist, cell physiologist, and public health administrator Florence Sabin; and philanthropist Mary Lasker, whose public health advocacy helped to spur a vast expansion of NIH.

Through our curation we have also brought forward historical knowledge about many groups of women and their wide-ranging experiences, expertise, interests, and roles in medicine and science. These groups have included women of the Frontier Nursing Service, women who composed unique, handwritten “receipt” books in which they noted, tested, and revised formulas for household remedies for common medical problems, as well as women physicians and nurses in the armed services of World War I and World War II. We have also told important stories about women who changed the face of medicine through their leadership and expertise, and those who confronted domestic violence and improved women’s lives.

We have also shown how women’s historical presence is sometimes obscured in larger accounts and must be made visible through careful reading and piecing together textual and visual evidence. Such curation enables us to reveal the stories of women who worked in labs at NIH, like Hope Hopps, as well as lab workers who worked in the California State Hygiene Lab in Berkeley just before World War I, and medical students who gathered tuberculosis patient data at Johns Hopkins University at the turn of the last century. NLM is also steward of the papers of early twentieth-century women bacteriologists whose important work is not widely known, including Alice Evans, Sarah Stewart, and Margaret Pittman. We collect and make these papers available to interested investigators, preserving their stories for future research.

Along with our many efforts focused on highlighting the experiences and voices of women in our collections, we also amplify the voices of today’s women historians, especially those from underrepresented backgrounds, who have studied our collections to advance their research. This month, we welcomed to our NLM History Talk series Patricia Palma, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Historical and Geographic Sciences at the University of Tarapacá, Arica, Chile. Dr. Palma spoke about her research on homeopathic therapies in Peru during the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, drawing on unique materials held by our institution. Last month, we welcomed Deirdre Cooper Owens, PhD, the Charles and Linda Wilson Professor in the History of Medicine & Director of the Humanities in Medicine Program, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Dr. Cooper Owens spoke about women whose stories of enslavement are part of the history of gynecology in the United States. In April, we will welcome Rana A. Hogarth, PhD, Associate Professor of History at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, who will speak on how people of African descent became targets of eugenic study during the early decades of the twentieth century. 

Notably, many of these curatorial efforts are themselves brought you by the women of NLM —archivists, librarians, historians, and exhibition and technical specialists. So, as we work year round to recognize women in history and connect with women making history, we also recognize each and every one of our colleagues who are themselves making history through their public service here in the world’s largest biomedical library!

Dr. Speaker has been Historian for the Digital Manuscripts Program since 2002. She conducts research, selects documents, and writes in-depth contextual narratives for the Profiles in Science project, and she carries out other historical work for HMD including articles, blog posts, presentations, and oral histories on a variety of topics. She is also the historical consultant for the NLM Web Collecting and Archiving Working Group. Dr. Speaker is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania.

As Chief of the NLM HMD, Dr. Reznick leads all aspects of the division in cooperation with his colleagues and has over two decades of leadership experience in federal, national-nonprofit, and academic spaces. As a cultural historian, he also maintains a diverse, interdisciplinary, and highly collaborative historical research portfolio supported by the library and based on its diverse collections and associated programs. Dr. Reznick is author of three books and numerous book chapters and journal articles, including, as co-author with his colleague Kenneth M. Koyle of “History matters: in the past, present & future of the NLM” published by the Journal of the Medical Library Association in 2021.

Learn more about many more women in medical history—and women making medical history—through the NLM HMD blog Circulating Now, Profiles in Science, @nlm_collections on Instagram, and the free NIH Videocast archive of NLM History Talks

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