From Our Community to Yours, Happy Healthful Halloween!

Guest post by Jeffrey S. Reznick, PhD, Chief of the History of Medicine Division (HMD) at the National Library of Medicine (NLM).

I have always associated Halloween with community and health.

My family and I appreciate the holiday for the way it brings together our neighborhood of individuals and families with diverse backgrounds, creativity, and interests, all celebrating the occasion safely and meaningfully. Some of our neighbors don’t observe the holiday, and we certainly respect their choice by interacting with them in other ways that bring us together as neighbors. But for me, Halloween is very much about community, family, and friends, and the benefits of gathering supportively.

When I was growing up in Rochester, New York, I participated in the trick-or-treat program for the United Nations Children’s Fund, learning how the coins I collected from my neighbors could help vulnerable children. After I arrived home, I tallied the money before placing it in a special mailing envelope. I also sorted my candy while my parents simultaneously—and paradoxically—reminded me not to eat too much and asked me to set aside some for them to enjoy.

In the weeks following Halloween, certain pieces of my saved candy would disappear; my memory of this fact is tied to understanding now that whoever helped themselves was still enjoying the holiday well into Thanksgiving. Candy is still a big part of Halloween, but now parents have better access to information about candy labels and food safety tips to consider before they and their children indulge. It should come as no surprise that I now simultaneously—and paradoxically—remind my daughters not to eat too much and ask them to save pieces of candy for me to enjoy, right up to and sometimes even beyond Thanksgiving.

Every Halloween, I also looked forward to the annual television broadcast of It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown, based on the Peanuts comics by Charles M. Schulz. With its humor, interesting cast of young characters, melodious music, and vibrant colors, the whole special gave meaning to the day. It also made me think about parts of the story involving Snoopy dressing himself in a World War I flying ace costume and imagining scenes behind the Western Front. Something bigger was going on here. That something—Schulz channeling his experiences as a combat soldier as well as his pride as a World War II veteran—partly inspired my interest to study and publish on wartime humanitarianism and experiences of soldiers wounded in World War I.  

I’ll confess that I still enjoy It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown. I watch it every year with my younger daughter who has come to enjoy it also. It makes the holiday special for both of us. I hope our time together today around the program will be transcendent and inform her future memories of the holiday, indeed time well spent laughing, appreciating the humor, wondering about Snoopy’s interest in dressing up like a World War I flying ace, and how precisely he sat comfortably atop his doghouse-turned-Sopwith Camel airplane.

Like Snoopy and the gang, and as my talented NLM colleagues have shared through their expertise of our collections, many people enjoy occasions like Halloween when they can don creative costumes and masks, think about the lore around black cats and skeletons, and regale each other with stories of ghosts and other frightful subjects. The timeless vulnerability and mystery of the human body form the basis for many of these observations and stories. Apropos, therefore, is the NLM’s newly redesigned online exhibition Dream Anatomy, which draws on collections of our library, along with work of 20th- and 21st-century artists, to explore how what lies beneath our skin has scared, amazed, entertained, fascinated, and inspired us.  Ultimately, Dream Anatomy demonstrates how art and the artistic imagination have always been an essential part of the science of anatomy and the fun of Halloween.

I join with my NLM colleagues to wish you and your family a truly healthful Halloween, one complete with experiences of togetherness in your community, treasured memories of past holidays and the creation of new memories to treasure in the future, and inspired learning through NLM’s globally appreciated collections, trusted health information resources, and the exciting and updated Dream Anatomy online exhibition.

Dr. Reznick leads all aspects of HMD and has over two decades of leadership experience in federal, nonprofit, and academic spaces. As a cultural historian, he also maintains a diverse, interdisciplinary, and highly collaborative historical research portfolio supported by the library and based on its diverse collections and associated programs. Dr. Reznick is the author of three books and numerous book chapters and journal articles, including as co-author with Ken Koyle of History matters: in the past, present & future of the NLM, published in 2021 by the Journal of the Medical Library Association

NLM’s Library Operations is Reimagining to Better Serve You

This blog was authored by staff who serve on the National Library of Medicine (NLM) Library Operations (LO) Strategies Working Group.

NLM is nearing its 200th anniversary in 2036, and NLM’s Library Operations (LO) is reflecting on its continuing mandate to acquire, organize, preserve, and disseminate biomedical information. LO is one of NLM’s largest divisions and comprises over 400 talented staff committed to furthering NLM as the world’s largest biomedical library and a leader in research in computational health informatics. We are re-envisioning our products, operations, and services for NLM’s diverse users around the world.

Last year, we created a “3Cs” framework—Collect, Curate, and Connect—to describe the work we do.

Each component represents the critical work LO performs, but the components do not function in isolation. They are interconnected and move together to achieve operational success.

Illustration shows 3 gears in the middle of various sizes. The gear on the left is titled “Collect” with text below that says acquire and preserve unique and trusted collection of biomedical information. The gear at the bottom is titled “Connect” with text below that says link our global audience to biomedical data and resources to make informed health decisions. The gear on the right is titled “Curate” with text below that says make biomedical information findable through data normalization, metadata, and data standards.
Embracing a Future of Data-Driven Discovery

Our 2021–2036 Long-Range Plan is strategic, thoughtful, and forward-thinking. It will address the challenges that come with the accelerated pace of changing technology, the rise and spread of health misinformation, evolving user expectations, and need for equal and inclusive access to unbiased information.

In support of the three pillars of the NLM Strategic Plan, LO will work collaboratively across NLM and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to build a data-driven workforce and with global partners to ensure our work accelerates biomedical discovery while reaching as many people as possible.

The five goals of our long-range plan will enhance LO’s mission and prepare us for the future as NLM reimagines its work post-pandemic and moves into its third century.

Illustration shows a 5-step process with numbers on top, description of  steps in the middle, and simple illustrations at the bottom. Step 1 says create a modernized organizational structure. Step 2 says unify and transform NLM collections. Step 3 says support and promote the use of health data standards and terminologies. Step 4 says customer design experience support. Step 5 says know and equitably engage our users.

Goal 1: Create a Modernized Organizational Structure. We will focus internally on our organizational structure, work processes, and the workforce expertise necessary to meet the future needs and expectations of our global users.

Goal 2: Unify and Transform NLM Collections. We will redefine and manage NLM’s diverse collection of both historical and modern content as “one collection,” valued by the world for the knowledge it holds to advance data-driven discovery. We will accelerate digitization, increase digital acquisitions, improve the discoverability of collections data, and continue investing in the physical collection space for future preservation.

Goal 3: Support and Promote the Use of Health Data Standards & Terminologies. We will position LO as a centralized leader in the production of and access to the terminologies, policies, data, and tools needed for wide-scale public use and research.

Goal 4: Provide Customer Design and Experience Support. We will support customers’ needs and translate them into product development and life cycle management by putting the principles of digital government strategy into practice.

Goal 5: Know and Equitably Engage Our Users. We will engage stakeholders to facilitate access, delivery, and dissemination of NLM’s collection and trusted NLM/NIH health information resources through community-driven engagement, training, and capacity-building programs.

The first phase of implementation for all five goals is currently underway, and we plan to continuously measure and assess our progress, evolve as needed, and continue to engage our stakeholders.

Our Commitment to Our Users

The interrelated 3Cs and five goals will allow us to continue to collaborate across our institution to serve NLM’s diverse users, enhance our role as a national library, maintain stewardship of the world’s largest biomedical collection, and serve as a key NIH institute. LO is committed to our continuous improvement, innovation, and data-based decision-making to support biomedical research discovery and integrity. Our core values of user focus, service, knowledge sharing, quality, and trustworthiness continue to serve as our beacon to confidently deliver on the goals outlined in this bold 15-year plan.

Libraries continue to evolve as their users’ needs and expectations change. How are you responding to the changing needs of your users?

Top Row (left to right):
Dianne Babski, Associate Director for Library Operations
Amanda J. Wilson, Deputy Associate Director for Library Operations
Jennifer L. Marill, Chief of the Technical Services Division
Jeffrey S. Reznick, PhD, Chief of the History of Medicine Division

Bottom Row (left to right):
Margaret A. McGhee, Chief of the Public Services Division
Deborah Lockett-Jordan, Senior Administrative Officer for Library Operations
David Gillikin, Chief of the Bibliographic Services Division

Revealing and Preserving Data for Today and Tomorrow

Guest post by Jeffrey S. Reznick, PhD, Chief of the History of Medicine Division (HMD) at the National Library of Medicine (NLM); Kenneth M. Koyle, MA, Deputy Chief of HMD; and Christie Moffatt, MLIS, Program Manager of the HMD Digital Manuscripts Program.

On this International Day for Universal Access to Information, we proudly showcase the globally appreciated role of NLM as a long-standing steward of vast collections of data even as it is now a recognized home of data science at the National Institutes of Health and beyond. A key part of the NLM mission is to provide access to that data and all the biomedical information we hold in our collections, which span ten centuries and originate from nearly every part of our world.

During the past several years, talented staff of the library have recognized this enduring and dedicated stewardship as part of our institution’s data-driven present and future by curating Revealing Data, an ongoing series of posts on the division’s popular blog Circulating Now. This series explores what data-minded researchers from a variety of disciplines are learning from centuries of data preserved in the collections of the NLM and associated with a variety of topics: from 17th-century bills of mortality to tuberculosis in the 19th-century to the 1918 influenza pandemic and more recent 20th- and 21st-century public health issues. Circulating Now also explores data-driven conservation research on some of our most treasured collections, research methods and tools for analysis in the study of digitized images and texts, and the origins, purpose, and development of highly regarded NLM resources like GenBank and the Index-Catalogue of the library of the Surgeon General’s Office.

A fundamental role of the NLM binds these data-driven explorations: its Congressionally mandated mission to collect, preserve, and provide access to past and present medical and scientific information in its multiplicity of formats, and, by extension, the vast amounts of data which reside in them. Generations of dedicated civil servants, including archivists, data scientists, historians, librarians, and many others, contributed their expertise to the NLM preserving the data-rich collections studied by a diverse field of researchers today. Without this commitment and these efforts, so much of this research would not be possible.

The NLM’s work of preservation continues today not only because it is mandated but also because the institution owes such work to future generations so they will be able to undertake their research, reveal new stories about the human condition, and make new discoveries. Today’s preservation work is evolving in tandem with changes to the collections themselves. NLM staff are developing new processes to collect and preserve web content, born-digital records, and digital ephemera while continuing to preserve vast quantities of data stored in paper, parchment, and vellum, some of it centuries old.

Viewed nearly 18,000 times since it was launched in 2017, Revealing Data reveals much more than valued data. It connects us to the very essence of NLM’s mission, its history, and the enduring importance of our institution’s initiative to preserve this data and the contexts in which it was originally created for today and tomorrow.

Dr. Reznick leads all aspects of HMD and has over two decades of leadership experience in federal, nonprofit, and academic spaces. As a cultural historian, he also maintains a diverse, interdisciplinary, and highly collaborative historical research portfolio supported by the library and based on its diverse collections and associated programs. Dr. Reznick is author of three books and numerous book chapters and journal articles including as co-author with Ken Koyle of History matters: in the past, present & future of the NLM, published in 2021 by the Journal of the Medical Library Association.

Before joining NLM, Mr. Koyle served as a medical evacuation helicopter pilot and as a historian in the U.S. Army. He is the co-editor with Dr. Reznick of Images of America: U.S. National Library of Medicine, which is a collaborative work with HMD staff.

Ms. Moffatt leads content development for NLM’s Profiles in Science website, which provides access to 20th century manuscripts in science, medicine, and public health. As Chair of the Library’s Web Collecting and Archiving Working Group, she supports web archiving on topics and events related to NLM collecting interests, including Global Health Events (Ebola, COVID-19, Monkeypox), HIV/AIDS, and the opioid epidemic, among others.

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