One Year of Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics, and Anticipating New Challenges

This piece was authored in collaboration with leadership across NIH and represents a unified effort to meet the testing-related challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic with excellence and innovation.

Over the past year, our team of NIH leaders has used this blog to report on an initiative called Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics – or RADxSM for short. The RADx initiative includes five key components designed to address the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic by ensuring that companies make and distribute tests to detect SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19; develop ways to deliver those tests and results directly to people—independent of their age, race, ethnicity, disability, financial status, or where they live; and invest in innovative approaches to detect emerging and spreading infections. NIH has also added a new component to RADx – to find ways to understand and address the concerns of people worried about testing, vaccine safety, and efficacy. The RADx components are described below.

RADx Underserved Populations (RADx-UP) is a significant investment to bring testing to traditionally underserved communities. Last fall, we launched a nationwide program, involving more than 60 research teams and a Coordination and Data Collection Center, to better understand the needs of people in a wide range of communities, and to ensure that underserved communities have adequate access to COVID-19-testing, and return results in ways that are actionable to promote health. We estimate that up to 500,000 people will participate in the study in more than 33 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico—representing a broad spectrum of communities of color and socially vulnerable populations. RADx-UP is collaborating with the NIH Community Engagement Alliance (CEAL) Against COVID-19 Disparities to further amplify the NIH’s focus on communities hardest hit. 

Through two programs within the RADx initiative — RADx Tech and RADx ATP (Advanced Technology Platforms)—researchers aim to accelerate evaluation, validation, and scale up of promising COVID-19 testing technologies for laboratory, point-of-care and at-home settings, and provide guidance on when to test. More than 700 applications were submitted to the programs’ unique “innovation funnel” review process over a three-month period. To date, 29 projects have progressed through multiple phases of review to receive contracts for expansion of manufacturing and clinical studies. RADx Tech and RADx-ATP-supported companies have increased COVID-19 testing capacity across the United States by more than 150 million tests and compressed the typical multi-year tech commercialization process into approximately six months.

RADx Radical (RADx-rad) is designed to support innovative research programs focused on developing novel and potentially “radical” ways to detect infectious disease from SARS-CoV-2 or other agents, and evaluate community spread. Unlike the RADx Tech and RADx-ATP programs, which focus on developing technologies that can be delivered in the near term, projects within RADx-rad may require additional time for development. While some of these projects may not be available in the near term to respond to the current COVID-19 pandemic, they could be potentially applicable to deploy quickly for future pandemics. Currently, RADx-rad projects involve a broad array of activities that range from analysis of wastewater for infectious agents, like SARS-CoV-2, all the way to the development of artificial sensory devices to detect volatile organic compounds that uniquely emanate from individuals carrying an infection. Most notably, RADx-rad provides a mechanism for giving radical ideas a chance to demonstrate efficacy and promise.

A central focus of the RADx data management strategy is the safe management of data that is collected, standardized, and harmonized as a result of the implementation of new and novel testing methodologies. The close collaboration with RADx data and coordinating centers to develop and implement common data elements and models is important to the success of this strategy; along with the facilitation of harmonized data sharing on a secure cloud-based data platform. This platform, the RADx data hub, will provide a research data repository of curated and de-identified RADx COVID-19 data—allowing researchers to find, aggregate, and perform data analysis. The data hub will also enable researchers to share results of their analyses (citing relevant data) with collaborators and the external community; and provide a portal where researchers can find additional data and information from other NIH-supported COVID-19 resources.

Although programs such as RADx have helped create COVID-19 tests and make them more available to the public, our work and your work is not done.

Vaccines will go a long way in bringing protections to society and researchers are still learning how well the vaccine prevents people from spreading the virus. Public health measures, such as wearing face masks and frequent testing, continue to be important in efforts to contain this pandemic and address its consequences on society. Testing resources and places to get tested have become more accessible, but still need to be more widely available, affordable, and convenient. Even once people are vaccinated, testing for the presence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in the nasal passage or in saliva needs to continue. This will help detect and identify new variants, discover asymptomatic infections, and help reduce community spread. As case rates decrease, these strategies will be complemented by the expansion of contact tracing to control the pandemic.

As vaccines help reduce the overall national prevalence of COVID-19, it’s important to pay attention to local trends in the percent of people who test positive and continue to test accordingly. Baseline testing should be adjusted to match regional and community needs and to prevent surges in community transmission. As the prevalence of positive tests decreases in a population, it will become cost-effective to test pooled samples from multiple donors by highly sensitive molecular tests, followed by testing of individual samples from any pools that are positive. Access to inexpensive rapid antigen tests authorized by FDA for self-testing and serial screening will continue to expand. Finally, tests that are designed to detect the presence of specific SARS-CoV-2 variants will become available. Ultimately, we’ll need to have baseline testing platforms and protocols in place to identify future outbreaks, detect other pathogens, and leverage these advances for accessible testing and treatment of other diseases.

The three W’s will remain an important part of society for some time:

  1. Wash your hands often and for at least 20 seconds.
  2. Wear your mask correctly for maximum protection.
  3. Watch your distance and avoid indoor gatherings without masks.

People need to be aware of and encouraged to sign up and use the exposure notification apps created by public health authorities and available on iPhone and Android devices. This secure electronic effort complements contact tracing and appears to be effective at saving lives by alerting people if they have been exposed to COVID-19 and providing guidance for further action.

Our response to COVID-19 is built not only on lessons learned over the past year, but also on the sustained investment in biomedical research of the past decades. We are proud of our agency and researchers for their efforts to mobilize and tackle this destructive pandemic. We are also very grateful to our research participants in communities around the country.

We’re interested in hearing how we could better serve the public.

Top Row (left to right):
Diana W. Bianchi, MD, Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD, Director, National Library of Medicine
Noni Byrnes, PhD, Director, Center for Scientific Review
Gary H. Gibbons, MD, Director, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Second Row (left to right):
Joshua Gordon, MD, PhD, Director, National Institute of Mental Health
Susan Gregurick, PhD, Associate Director for Data Science and Director, Office of Data Science Strategy
Richard J. Hodes, MD, Director, National Institute on Aging
Helene Langevin, MD, Director, National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Third Row (left to right):
Jon R. Lorsch, PhD, Director, National Institute of General Medical Sciences
George A. Mensah, MD, Division Director, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
Eliseo J. Perez-Stable, MD, Director, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities
William Riley, PhD, Director, NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research

Bottom Row (left to right):
Tara A. Schwetz, PhD, Associate Deputy Director, National Institutes of Health
Bruce J. Tromberg, PhD, Director, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering
Nora D. Volkow, MD, Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse
Richard (Rick) P. Woychik, PhD, Director, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Vaccines, Vaccinations, and NLM

As I write this message, I am one of the more than 25 million people in the U.S. who have received both doses of the coronavirus vaccine. I received my first dose of the Pfizer vaccine on February 4, and my second dose on February 25. NIH is distributing vaccines to employees based on priority group following general guidance from the CDC, but I became eligible first through my health plan. I’m sharing my story with you today and highlighting how the NLM has and still plays a role in vaccines and vaccinations during this time of the COVID pandemic.

Getting a spot in the COVID vaccine line will become one of the shared stories of this pandemic. As story tellers, we will likely exchange tales of how each of us got that prized place, particularly for those of us who received the vaccine in the first few weeks of distribution.

Here’s my story: As a resident of Washington, DC, and someone who is over 65 years of age, I became eligible pretty early – January 11. At the time, DC released appointment slots through its public web site. What if you don’t have a computer, typing skills, or access to the internet? Can the public library help here? Of course! In addition to providing internet access and coaching support from library staff, some public libraries are becoming sites for the distribution of the COVID vaccine. Each Monday and every other Thursday, as more appointment slots were released, I dutifully logged into the DC vaccination registration website, entering details and hitting refresh. Unfortunately, the available slots ran out quickly with each attempt. It was indeed frustrating. Through my health plan, I was entered into a vaccine registration list. As an NIH employee, I got my name on a list too. I was probably number 15,543 at NIH since I am healthy and able to work remotely, but I became eligible through my health plan in late January and was spared the déjà vu of type, refresh, repeat!

NLM played a big role in helping get this vaccine to me and people around the world.

We played a key role in making sure the genomic basis for vaccines and therapeutics were freely available to the public. In January 2020, NLM released the first fully annotated SARS-CoV-2 gene sequence to the public through our GenBank database, the world’s largest database of publicly available genetic sequences. Because NLM maintains extensive data repositories of nucleic acid sequences – the building blocks of genes – researchers were able to search NLM’s entire Sequence Read Archive (SRA) to better understand and characterize the biological properties of SARS-CoV-2 in record time. 

NLM created a dedicated website, the Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 data hub, for researchers to search, retrieve, and analyze data for more than 150,000 digital genomic sequences of the virus. In addition, we partnered with publishers around the world to make available for computerized data mining the full text of over 100,000 articles related to the coronavirus, helping scientist to identify key biological targets. Our ClinicalTrials.gov repository includes over 400 studies designed to develop, evaluate, and determine the effects of various COVID-19 vaccines.

Screen shot of MedlinePlus COVID-19 webpage

Our MedlinePlus consumer health information site contains specialized information about COVID-19 vaccines, clinical studies, and the vaccine distribution process. MedlinePlus helps people find information (in English and Spanish) about the COVID-19 vaccination program in the United States, and is a resource where people can find reliable, up-to-date information about how to protect themselves and their loved ones against infection while awaiting the vaccine. Linking to health information from the NIH and other federal government agencies such as the FDA and CDC, MedlinePlus provides access to fact sheets, statistics and research, journal articles, and even videos to help people learn more about COVID-19 vaccines.

What makes NLM unique is not just that it contributed to the process that helped make vaccines available, it’s that NLM has been helping scientists, clinicians and the public understand, prevent, manage, and cope with infectious diseases and health problems for nearly 200 years.

To Prevent Influenza!, 1918
National Library of Medicine #101580385

NLM identifies, selects, and archives a remarkable volume of content documenting these pandemics, from the scientific journals to the public health announcements. We were here 100 years ago, preserving information about the 1918 influenza pandemic, and we’re on track to be here in 100 years when future scholars and members of the public want to peruse the records of the COVID-19 pandemic and other health challenges faced by society.

The NLM serves scientists and society by providing trusted health information to understand, prevent and treat illness in support of public health. How can we help you?

10 Tips After 10 Months of Video Calls

Like most of the world, staff at NLM has been engaging with others through various technologies – video conferencing, virtual daily work huddles, and conference-inspired meetings that require screen sharing, virtual breakout rooms, chat features and instant messaging. I’ve gone from a 30-minute commute, including a short walk and a metro ride, to a 3-minute walk from my bedroom to my home office. Those lovely, long walks across the NIH campus that formed the bridges between meetings three or four times a day are now replaced by 60-second coffee refills between almost-non-stop video calls between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. And where before I only had to make sure that I looked professional and polished, I must now make sure that there’s no clutter or distracting pictures or items in the background – the camera sees everything!

Fortunately for me, I regard meetings as a high art. For the past 15 years, meetings have been one of the main mechanisms through which I work. Early on I learned two great tips from a great biomedical informatics guru, John Glaser

Never walk out of a meeting with more to do than you came in with, and never close a meeting without knowing who is taking the next steps on every item.

This comes in handy when your days are lived on camera! I can’t match the wisdom of John, but I can share some ideas that are proving helpful to me as I (virtually) meet with NIH colleagues, the NLM leadership team, individuals with whom I’m collaborating, and NLM staff through “brown bag” lunch sessions.

I’d like to share a few of my own tips garnered from my years of in-person and virtual meetings.

Call people by name, often.

This is particularly helpful if you are leading a meeting, for it acknowledges people and engages them in the moment. It is also important when you are a participant. Using names helps compensate for the lack of communication cues in video calls, such as eye contact and head nodding, and fosters engagement and stimulates participation.

Start on time and end on time.

I know I’m not the only one whose days are lived through conference calls and video chat. By starting and ending on time, you demonstrate respect for everyone on the call, as well as those in the prior and subsequent calls. In addition, it saves you from having to start every next call with the “sorry I was finishing up a previous call” apology.

Allow for pauses.

This is important for the leader of the meeting and is also equally relevant for participants. It can be difficult to pick up on visual and audio cues, gestures, and conversational threads, such as someone leaning back, leaning in, shifting their gaze, or changing their tone of voice. So, it becomes particularly important to let pauses stand an extra second or two to allow someone to come off mute or organize their thoughts.

Keep your camera on when possible.

Keeping your camera on provides visual evidence that you are present and attentive during the conversation and meeting discourse. It’s courteous to others, and yes, it does mean that you have to attend to the image being displayed, but it allows your colleagues to see that you’re not reading email or distracted by other issues. It also reinforces the connection between the speaker and the audience and enhances a sense of group engagement. Although some may worry about excessive bandwidth consumption, the social value is worth it!

Keep your microphone off unless speaking!

Visual cues are important; auditory cues are distracting. Until technology advances, microphones (mics) often create distortion, pick up background noise, contribute to audio feedback, and generally degrade the conversational experience. Remaining on mute signals respect for the speaker and gives them a non-competitive platform for discussion. It helps to learn the steps of muting and un-muting to keep up with the rhythm of the conversation.

Check your mic often and use a headset with a good mic.

Get to know your mic, how it works, and the indicators that it’s live. Poor audio quality can affect the experience of the video call for everyone. Many of us forget that the mic is on our laptop and the further away we are from the mic, the poorer the audio. I’ve found that using a headset helps because it puts the mic close to your mouth and will help minimize background noise. It is key to your personal happiness and professional survival that you make sure you know how to troubleshoot basic mic issues, particularly knowing when your mic is on, when it’s NOT on, and to stay alert so it’s never on when you don’t realize it! 

Use chat features judiciously.

Most video conferencing software has some type of text support, usually called “chat.” I find this feature to be very useful when I’m NOT the speaker and very annoying when I am. Sometimes, in a big and exciting meeting, sidebar conversations held through the chat feature can provide clarification and enhance the shared experience. However, every thought appears on the screen and it can be distracting to the speaker. If you really want to chat your way through a video call, consider setting up a parallel channel in a different platform for that purpose or consult with your speaker beforehand. Your speakers will thank you!

Watch your backgrounds!

Video conferences introduce us to the private lives of our colleagues in ways never before anticipated, often by having the opportunity to look over the shoulder of your colleague and into their background. Some video conferencing platforms allow you to customize the image projected on your screen – a blessing and a bane. Remember that some backgrounds may best be left for personal calls with friends or family, and professional engagements do best with a more subdued background where the interest can focus on the person, not the background.

Take notes.

Many of the mental mechanisms we use in human discourse add meaning and interpretation to the words that are exchanged. We remember how a colleague smiled when bringing up a new idea, or the worried look when your words weren’t well understood. Note taking (I use a fountain pen and write in long hand) helps keep me focused during video calls, aids me in organizing thoughts, and often provides a reminder for the next meeting or conversation.

Take a break!

This tip is for you; not about using the technology. Technology is unrelenting and always demanding. The immediacy of work, the pull of people waiting for a meeting to begin, and our tendency to overschedule can lead to very packed days. As an industrial engineer with human factors training, I know that performance degrades over time and short breaks help! Schedule breaks – at least every two hours – even if only for five minutes. Take a walk, hug your child or someone you love, or start a load of laundry. The goal is to refocus and refresh!

What have you learned from 10 months of video conferencing? Please share your tips and ideas here – we are all in this together.

We’re “Going to Have to Science the **** Out of This!”

When faced with the other-worldly, complex challenges of surviving on Mars after being left behind by his shipmates, Matt Damon, who plays an astronaut in the movie, The Martian, knows that his only chance of survival will require him to call on all of his scientific knowledge and understanding of the scientific method in order to meet his basic needs, explore new terrain, and establish new routines for everyday living.

Along the way, he must adapt to constant changes in the environment, technological disruptions, and the challenges of remote collaboration. Sound a little too familiar?  

The process of remote work that has become the new normal for most of NIH and NLM staff is beginning to resemble the experience of an astronaut stranded on Mars. It has required all of us to figure out how to meet our basic needs – food, socialization, activity, and rest; explore new terrain – home as the workplace; and identify new routines. We’ve continued to face man-made and natural challenges, such as fires, hurricanes and floods, been relegated to virtual meetings, and have worked collaboratively without the benefit of being in the same physical space. Yet, at no other time has it ever been so important for NLM to keep innovating for the future.  


I’m calling your attention back to the experience of our abandoned astronaut for a very specific reason — his use of scientific knowledge, insight, and experience to analyze opportunities and identify innovative solutions. This serves as a great model to illustrate the work happening at NLM.

NLM has prioritized the health and safety of our workforce while responding to COVID-19 and keeping our public-facing services available to the scientists, clinicians, patients, and families around the world who use them millions of times every day.  

We continue to work at the top of our game, adding nearly one million new citations in PubMed, expanding access to coronavirus literature through PubMed Central (PMC), and launching the first phase of the NIH Preprint Pilot to test the viability of making preprints searchable in PMC and increase the discoverability of early NIH-funded research results.

We’ve opened up new lines of research: our intramural investigators are applying their talents in computational modeling to examine microbiome in wastewater to detect evidence of the novel coronavirus, and using integrated comparative genomics and machine learning techniques to identify key genomic features that could differentiate SARS-CoV-2 from other strains of coronavirus that cause less severe disease.


Yet, it’s not enough to do just enough. We must continue to prepare to advance and support the future of scientific communication and build on the public’s trust in NLM.

It’s long been a hallmark of NLM to scan the external scientific environment, verify observed needs, and create scientific communication and dissemination tools to support the scientific environment.

Think back to the 1980s. Something was happening within our country (genomics revolution on the horizon) and across NLM (building the foundation of the scientific communication tools needed to support genomics) that led to the emergence of the National Center for Biotechnology Information in 1988.

Many, many forces needed to be aligned to make this happen: the critical vision of how a library could accelerate a genomics revolution; the talents of one of the best scientific analytical and communications workforces; the political goodwill of a Congress invigorated by scientific opportunity; the specific language needed to create the authorization legislation; and, of course, a bit of vision, hubris, and innovation brought about by the NLM team of Drs. David Lipman, James Ostell, Dennis Benson and David Landsman..


So how do we “science the **** out of this” to create the future of 2030 from the foundations of 2020? Doing for science what the decade of 1980-1990 did for genomics.  

First, we begin with our strongest suit — collecting, organizing, and disseminating scientific literature. We’re doing this by aligning our investment in novel products, such as moving NLM’s  Sequence Read Archive (SRA) to commercial cloud platforms, while stimulating new investigations such as computational approaches to curation at scale to accelerate the automated indexing of large health data sets. We’ll build on our strong foundation that grows from and relies on systematic, public-informed decision making related to the acquisition, indexing and dissemination of biomedical and health information as stated in our authorizing legislation. We’ll rely on our 2017-2027 Strategic Plan guided by the NLM Board of Regents. We’ll also engage our researchers and staff, who interact with the public, to make sure that NLM’s offerings are available to the public, 24/7, without charge or restriction.


What other sciences can help with this? Organizational science can help us remain open to future growth opportunities that may look different from our past successes. Public health sciences can identify the end-users of NLM services and offerings ranging from patients to clinicians to researchers to policymakers, so that we can continue to ensure we are meeting their needs. The biological, physical, and clinical sciences signal the future ways that we might understand the health and wellbeing of all, with social sciences providing tools to reposition organizations towards the future they hope to shape.

However, the marooned astronaut in the movie did not completely rely on science alone. You might remember his (dis)pleasure at discovering the disco music left by his commander. (He didn’t really like her choice of music.) This minor plot point tells us that to effectively “science the **** out of this” requires that we continue to look to the arts and humanities to translate science into the human experience to help us understand what goes on inside of us, and show us what it means to be a human being. The arts and humanities are an important part of the way we bring our own inspirations and ways to design the future.

How will we make this happen? We’ll need to identify, align, and share new models for innovation. We’ll have to learn to relax the structure of video conference technologies to mimic the hallway and in-person conversations and reduce the sense of ‘presentation’ on the screen to become presence in the moment.

But most importantly, we’ll need your ideas and guidance. How do we keep innovation alive under the constraints of our everyday life in COVID-19? Can you help inspire us to innovate?

All for One…Health for All: The Role of Open Access, Evidence-Based Information to Improve Health for All Species

Guest post by Kristine M. Alpi, MLS, MPH, PhD, AHIP, OHSU Library, Oregon Health & Science University; Tova Johnson, MPH, MA, MLIS, OHSU Library, Oregon Health & Science University; and Heather K. Moberly, MSLS, AHIP, FHEA, PgCert (Vet Ed), University Libraries, Texas A&M University

Physical isolation arising from the COVID-19 pandemic has led many people to increasingly engage with the outdoor environment or bring companion animals into their lives as supports for their physical and mental wellbeing.

This connection among the health of humans, animals, and the environment exemplifies the One Health approach. 

One Health is not new, but it has gained new life amid rising concerns over COVID-19 and the environment in recent years. This model encourages collaboration across disciplines, with experts in human, animal, and environmental health, along with other specialties, to achieve better public health outcomes. While leaders often come from veterinary medicine or public health, anyone committed to keeping the world healthy is a potential partner in One Health. 


Providing high-quality, timely information to the people and professionals who need it most is critical to protecting the health of people, animals, and the environment. The FDA uses the term animal health literacy to provide the public with information about drug and food safety concerns that can have an impact on animals and humans. The joint NLM/FDA resource, DailyMed, includes drug listings approved for either humans or animals.

NLM’s MedlinePlus online health information resource provides robust information on animal-human interactions, but typically with a focus on those that threaten human health such as animal bites or zoonoses (diseases that can be passed between humans and animals). To get information from animal health experts, we can look to information providers such as veterinary educators to provide insights offering the interconnected One Health perspective.

Just as MedlinePlus relies, in part, on health professional societies to provide information on specialized care, veterinary medicine trains specialists in topics ranging from behavior to surgery, and provides information to support decision-making about large and small companion animal healthcare. Animal health information in multiple languages is not centrally coordinated, but the American College of Veterinary Surgeons is one example that offers information in Spanish as well as English.


Beyond personal experiences caring for animals at home or at work, One Health is a critical framework for providing timely, open, high-quality information during times of wildfires and natural disasters that can affect all species. Responding to natural disasters brings together teams who work primarily with humans and teams who typically work with animals. Many veterinary schools provide emergency preparedness education in addition to deploying veterinary emergency teams to respond to emergency situations that may be all species-focused or primarily a human health oriented mission. Central knowledge resources like the American Red Cross also provide apps and information to support people and pets during times of crisis.

Libraries who participate in the NLM-supported Network of the National Library of Medicine are essential resources for people seeking information online from trusted sources. Health sciences librarians, particularly the members of the Medical Library Association’s Animal and Veterinary Information Specialist Caucus, support the health of all species by addressing questions raised by people who live, work, and share the broader environment with companion animals and wildlife. These questions may come to public, community college, and university libraries who rely on free and direct access to high-quality resources written for a variety of audiences.

We recently presented Health Questions for All Species as a free webinar for the Oregon Reference Summit to highlight how to use NLM and other open access, evidence-based resources to address One Health questions. We acknowledged the value of regionally and culturally specific resources for populations who are particularly challenged by certain conditions or environmental exposures, and discussed similarities and differences in human and animal information sources, terminology and readability.

We hope this information expanded your awareness about how NLM and other information resources can promote One Health through an integrated approach to searching and addressing issues that impact humans, animals and our environment.

The One Health Commission is a great place for educational resources for teachers and learners who want to take another step towards Health for All.

Did you learn something new today? What can you do to contribute to One Health?

Kristine M. Alpi, MLS, MPH, PhD, AHIP, OHSU Library, Oregon Health & Science University and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Population Health & Pathobiology, North Carolina State University.

Tova Johnson, MPH, MA, MLIS, OHSU Library, Oregon Health & Science University.

Heather K. Moberly, MSLS, AHIP, FHEA, PgCert (Vet Ed), Medical Sciences Library and department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Heather is a 2020 recipient of the Friends of the National Library of Medicine’s Michael E. DeBakey Library Services Outreach Award