A Strategy for Strategic Planning

Focusing on the reach

I’ve noted before that NLM has launched a year-long strategic planning process.

Well, we’re in the thick of things now.

We’re hearing from and reaching out to researchers, clinicians, librarians, teachers, first responders, and myriad other stakeholders (including you!), from all over the world.

Hundreds of people from scientific communities to our own staff submitted comments regarding NLM’s priorities and future directions. More than 500 people who work at NLM attended a town hall meeting. We’ve visited three of the universities that host our biomedical informatics research training programs (and plan to visit all of them over the next 18 months). We’ve launched several functional audits, which include an examination of our level of investment in outreach and how best to use the Medical Subject Headings to tag the scientific literature.

Then last week we hosted the first of four stakeholder panels. Each of these panels comprises 15-20 experts in biomedical research, medical informatics, library science, and consumer health. The first panel explored—and will continue exploring—how NLM can accelerate basic biomedical and translational sciences.

Led by Art Levine, Dean of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh, and guided by our Board of Regents’ strategic planning co-chairs Dan Masys and Jill Taylor, this group is considering:

  • the evolving role of NLM in support of global biomedical research;
  • how to accommodate the explosive growth of research data in the life sciences;
  • providing access to the research data sets underlying publications, to support reproducibility, meta-analysis, and optimal return on public investment in science;
  • NLM’s relationship to other NIH Institutes and Centers, including the Library’s role in the Precision Medicine Initiative and other large-scale prospective cohort projects;
  • collaborations with extramural organizations to move science forward; and
  • future directions of key data resources.

And that’s just one of the panels!

Obviously, this is a big task, so here’s where our strategy comes in.

Often people get concerned that if something doesn’t appear in the strategic plan, it will be lost, but that is not the case here. NLM’s core mission remains strong and vibrant. We’re being ambitious and asking these panels to focus on big gains, audacious goals, the reach-beyond-the-reach that will make NLM an even better platform for discovery. That way, the precious time spent together can focus more on that reach than on reassurance.

So what’s in our core mission?

Our core mission remains
central to who we are.

Looking back to our authorizing legislation, we are charged “to assist the advancement of medical and related sciences and to aid the dissemination and exchange of scientific and other information important to the progress of medicine and to the public health.”

This means that we’ll continue producing PubMed, PubChem, dbGaP, ClinVar, and all the databases used by over 4 million users a day. We’ll continue sponsoring research and training, and we’ll continue outreach so that everyone, everywhere, can use our resources. We’ll continue supporting the application of terminology and messaging standards to ensure the interoperability of health data. And we’ll continue vigorously advocating for knowledge management across the NIH.

Our core mission remains central to who we are.

Our strategy is moving us beyond our core mission to figure out what only NLM can and should do to accelerate the progress of medicine and public health.

Get ready for great visions!

Think You’re Seeing Double?

The astute among you (or the inveterate blog watchers) caught me blogging on a new outlet last week: DataScience@NIH. You’re not seeing double, and I haven’t abandoned NLM Musings from the Mezzanine.

In January, 2017 I assumed the role of the NIH Interim Associate Director for Data Science (iADDS), as Dr. Phil Bourne stepped down from his position as the inaugural Associate Director for Data Science.

I now have two distinct but related roles: iADDS and the Director of NLM. As the iADDS, I have responsibilities to the whole of NIH to work with my fellow institute and center directors to guide NIH’s future investments in data science. As the NLM Director I must lead the Library in its day-to-day operations and the creation of its new strategic plan.

The two jobs are a natural pairing.

The challenges of big data—its size, variability, and accessibility—align with the strengths of the library. In fact, recognizing how big data’s technical complexity leveraged NLM’s core strengths, the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director recommended making NLM the intellectual hub for data science in June 2015. They wrote, “NLM is now poised to build on its activities in computational-based research, data dissemination, and training to assume the NIH leadership role in data science.”

My taking on the iADDS role is one step toward making that recommendation a reality. Fortunately I am guided by an outstanding NLM leadership team (I’ll introduce you to them later), and terrific colleagues across the NIH, particularly those in the Scientific Data Council.

It’s an exciting time and having a view from above (iADDS) and a view from within (Director, NLM) helps me see both the challenges and the pathways to resolution. I’ll keep these two blogs going but sometimes point back and forth, so that you can see where my thoughts are going.

I welcome your thoughts. How should the NLM help NIH meet the challenges of data science? What is the role of the NLM in ensuring that data are FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable)? And most importantly, how do we accelerate discovery through data? The NLM needs your questions and your ideas!

Photo credit: Doug Racine, US Fish & Wildlife Service [Flickr]

Walk with Me While I Walk with Those Who Walked for Freedom

Those bold enough to confront challenges bring change.

Throughout February, in commemoration of Black History Month, the National Library of Medicine and the NIH Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) join together to celebrate and honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the civil rights movement with a poster exhibition in the lobby of the Lister Hill Center.

A few weeks ago, I had the privilege of touring this exhibition with Ms. Debra Chew, Director of NIH EDI, and Mr. Danny Dickerson, Director of EDI’s Diversity and Inclusion Division. We talked about the power of citizens to affect change and observed how far we have come—and how far we have yet to go—toward true equality. But we also took time to quietly take in the exhibit.

I was struck immediately by how young everyone looked in the photos—and in fact, they were. Julian Bond was only in his mid-20s but already a skilled activist, and Shirley Chisholm was not quite 40, still a few years shy of being the first African-American woman elected to Congress. The images of the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. were the most striking to me—odd because his face is so familiar. But in these images I particularly noticed his eyes. At one and the same time they were lighthearted and welcoming, fierce and wise.

As a teenager in the 1960s and as the NLM Director today, I felt Dr. King’s call to act and to serve, with the slight warning that, while both could be fulfilling, both would be fraught with challenge.

But history has shown that those bold enough to confront challenges bring change.

Image collage
Photo collage of civil rights icons Rosa Parks, Thurgood Marshall, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Jackie Robinson, Shirley Chisholm, and Julian Bond.

The inspiration and hard work of the civil rights movement shaped health care in so many ways. We recognized that separate care is not equal care, and that those who experience the chronic stress of poor housing, limited schooling, and societal bias (increasingly subtle but sadly still present) have special needs. The medical literature is more complete now than it was 50 years ago, with greater attention to the experience of health by those whose race and ethnicity differ from what we once called “the majority.” NLM’s Specialized Information Services Division uses in-person and web-based strategies to make health information not simply available, but also accessible to those who hold different cultural values and have different life experiences. And our History of Medicine Division guides us to preserve not only typical images of health, such as anatomy drawings, but also the unexpected—images like the one above showing members of the Medical Committee for Civil Rights as they participate in the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Do images inspire you to think about health?

Then take a look at some of the over 70,000 images available through our History of Medicine collection and see what awaits.

And if you’re nearby, I encourage you to come to the National Library of Medicine, NIH Building 38a (Lister Hill Center), to walk through our brief history of the civil rights movement and to consider the brave men and women who stepped forward to ensure that all people share equal rights.

The exhibition is open through February 28 from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm weekdays, except federal holidays.

For more information about the exhibition, please contact Melanie Modlin, Deputy Director, Office of Communications and Public Liaison, National Library of Medicine at 301.496.7771.

Who’s Out There?

I write this blog for a number of reasons.

Sharing my ideas helps me clarify my thoughts. It helps me plant a seed to advance an idea or enlist your support. It also gives me the opportunity to introduce different aspects of the National Library of Medicine and its vast array of services.

And obviously, I write each post intending it to be read, but who exactly are my readers?

A coach once told me that, before I start any writing project, I must envision my readers. Here are the readers I envision right now:

Some of you are stakeholders of the Library and its products and services—researchers, clinicians, librarians, patrons, policy makers, and NLM staff members. Many of you have already shared your ideas, stimulated by some of my writings; I encourage more of you to do so!

Other readers are my loyal friends and professional colleagues who want to know what I’m up to in this phase of my life. These folks are more likely to tell me privately they’ve read the blog or they look forward to the next installment.

Still others find their way here through the power of connections and the exhortation to “read this.” That is, they might get a link to the blog post from someone who found an idea to be interesting, provocative, or maybe even wrong.

Wrong? Could there be someone who takes issue with or maybe even disagrees with a perspective I have advanced?

Of course. Probably a few someones.

I recognize that people may (and likely do) hold different perspectives on some of the ideas I’ve already advanced, such as providing information to people on the move or the sly bemusement I expressed regarding the Cold-War origins of the building. Sometimes I even hear from them. That’s why there’s space here for readers to talk back.

Bring it on, I say!

Because ultimately, the reason I write this blog is to engage with you.

What’s on your mind? You have the floor.

What Can the Audubon Bird Count Teach Us About Open Science?

Citizen engagement shakes up roles, expands resources

One of the themes we are delving into as part of the strategic planning process is the role of NLM in advancing data science, open science, and biomedical informatics. Today I want to home in on the “open science” part of that theme.

Open science espouses a collaborative, open, engaged approach to all processes of the scientific endeavor. To some it includes open access to journals (with our PubMed Central a flagship example) and open data (accelerated by our ClinicalTrials.gov efforts to make the results of clinical trials available to the general public within a year of trial completion). Open science approaches are emerging in part because the World Wide Web enabled a democratization of information and communication, and in part because scientists realized they can benefit from early and open dialogue about approaches and findings. To me, a novel and important aspect of open science is the engagement of lay people across the continuum of the scientific effort—citizens engaged in science.

Perhaps the best known and oldest citizen science project is the Audubon Bird Count. Begun as an alternative to the holiday hunting traditions, this project engages citizens around the world, in well-structured bird circles, who go to their local woods and neighborhoods to create a wildlife census. Now in its 117th year, the Audubon Bird Count has been spectacularly successful—over 70,000 volunteers worldwide have counted more than 11 million birds, traced migratory patterns, and discovered new locations for some species. This example of citizen science illustrates one way citizens can do what professionals alone cannot—in this case, visit far-reaching places to make observations guided by professional knowledge.

A speckled birdThe Audubon Bird Count shows citizens participating in science as extenders, collecting data far beyond what scientists can do alone. Citizens can also serve as collaborators, working side by side with scientists to help analyze and interpret data. The Foldit portal, for example, engages citizen game players in recognizing patterns and solving puzzles that ultimately crowdsource how proteins fold. And in a very advanced form of citizen science, citizens and scientists co-create knowledge, partnering to pose research questions, set funding priorities, determine analytical approaches, and evaluate evidence.

Open science promises to accelerate knowledge building by complementing (or sometimes disrupting) traditional approaches to discovery with strategies that bring many more perspectives into the research process earlier, and with greater dialogue. With open science, scientists have new roles and gain new resources not available under traditional research models. And when citizens are engaged in the process, society benefits by raising the level of scientific understanding among participants and, by extension, across communities.

For NLM to be more fully involved in open science, our long-standing approaches to research support and scholarly communication must take on new dimensions. What do you think those might be?

If you’d like to share your own examples of open science or your ideas for integrating open science into the Library’s role, comment here or, in keeping with our bird theme, send me a tweet at @NLMdirector. I’d love to hear about them.

Reaching Those on the Move

Health information for the uprooted or displaced

Last month I was privileged to visit the Phillips Collection, the new Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), and the White House. (I know, quite a month!) Each place was inspiring, but I found an unexpected thread linking them: the concept of migration.

At the Phillips, I viewed all 60 panels of Jacob Lawrence’s The Migration Series, reunited for a special exhibition. (The Phillips owns all the odd numbered panels in the series, the Museum of Modern Art in New York the even ones.) These colorful block images depict the migration of African Americans from the rural South to the industrial North, showing men and women in the fields, families at train stations, workers in steel mills, and a changing home life.

Later, at the NMAAHC, I traversed 500 years of African American history and culture, from the enslaved Africans to the first African American president. Then just before Christmas I toured the current home of that president. In the Green Room of the White House, I saw another Jacob Lawrence painting, “The Builders.” At the end of the migration, a chance to build a new life!

Busy workmen on an active construction site, painted in browns, reds and blues.
“The Builders.” This painting of a group of men constructing a building was done by Jacob Lawrence in 1947. It hangs in the Green Room of the White House. (The White House Historical Association)

Those art pieces and museum exhibits inspired me to think about an important way NLM serves the health information needs of the public: how we reach people on the move.

We need to provide health information—often specific and potentially unfamiliar—to people when they are not in their usual, stable places, whether they’re traveling, in the hospital, or uprooted due to war or natural disaster. To do that successfully, we need to explore new ways to get our information out.

Our consumer health website, MedlinePlus, is fully responsive. As a result, it’s easy to use whether viewed on a full-sized monitor or a smartphone’s small screen. The full NLM website is responsive as well. But providing dynamic mobile content takes us only part of the way toward serving people on the move.

NLM’s Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC), within our Specialized Information Services Division, travels that road even further. Our staff focus on maintaining access to health information at all phases of disasters and public health emergencies, circumstances which create their own unique challenges for staying connected and staying informed. Most recently, this impressive team set up websites to aid people in the path of Hurricane Matthew and to provide up-to-the minute information on the Corpus Christi water emergency.

On a larger scale, they have developed apps that serve the specific needs of first responders and emergency personnel, folks who are regularly on the move and encountering unexpected, shifting conditions. These apps—WISER, REMM, and CHEMM—help emergency personnel respond to hazardous materials (hazmat) incidents and chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events.

But Jacob Lawrence’s images depicting the terror and beauty of people on the move inspire me to do more. How can we build upon our services for emergency personnel? What else can we do to get health information to people on the move? How can we make sure those uprooted or displaced can readily access information and make sense of it despite the strains of being in unfamiliar locations or unstable circumstances?

I invite you to share your thoughts below.

Leading in Transitions

Maintaining continuity in a time of change

Those of you watching the calendar have probably figured out that I’ve been on the job as the NLM Director for just about five months. My past 30 years were spent in academe, and I figured the biggest transition I would be facing was from academic to Federal employee—daunting but doable, I thought!

I had not figured on the difference between my transition from academic to fed and THE TRANSITION, the change brought about when a new president takes over for a sitting president and the reshuffling in the House and Senate that accompanies it. The logistics of a presidential transition are many—with a good percentage actually completed by October—including preparing briefing books for the incoming administration.

This task is more challenging than it might sound. Putting together a briefing book means distilling this $400 million operation down to a 3.5-page summary detailing our goals, staffing, and key actions for the near future. None of this would have been possible for a newbie without the diligence and insights of Betsy Humphreys, our NLM Deputy Director.

Beyond NLM, it seems to me that the NIH and the entire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) is experiencing a mixture of business-as-usual, excitement about change, and curiosity about where a new DHHS Secretary and a whole new administration (with 4,000 new political appointees) will take us.

So what is my role in all of this?

My primary job is to ensure adequate resources for the men and women who work here to create and manage our products and services (such as PubMed, the Common Data Elements Repository, the UMLS, PubChem, ClinVAR, TOXNET, etc.), preserve our historical collections, conduct research, and develop new ways to document clinical trials. I also need to be an advocate for the NLM in NIH-wide discussions about how to foster discovery and support clinical practice in a time of uncertain direction. I must be mindful of my own tolerance for ambiguity, being sure to listen to the concerns of staff and colleagues, respond with confidence, and provide reassurance in a realistic manner.

No leadership job comes with a crystal ball, and my personal opinions about how the future will pan out do not serve as a guide for action. What does guide me is the wisdom arising from the strong NLM leadership team, formed prior to my arrival and now pivoting to guide me as I lead the Library not only in anticipating our third century but also in transitioning to a new administration. The NLM enjoys broad respect and acceptance, so I expect our core mission to persist, but frankly, I too am curious about what the future holds.

What do you think this transition will bring us?